Instructor: Jonathan Kamakawiwoʻole Osorio

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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 11 of 11
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Osorio, John ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: I don't think this course could be [taught] from somebody from outside [of Hawaiʻi]. I don't see how that could possibly happen. I also don't see why people couldn't teach courses like this from many different communities... in any place where you have a tradition of music that's generations old, that's regional...[these types of courses] should be there and they should embody those places and those communities.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 10 of 11
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Osorio, John ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: It was very poetic. Pidgin has that quality... because of its directness and abruptness. The statements are almost always short and sentences can be more like phrases and they have a rhythm to it. [When a student submitted a paper in pidgin], I gave feedback in pidgin because you have to. You have to honor that, and you have to make sure [the student] understands that you are reading this in their language.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 9 of 11
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Osorio, John ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: A kind of dispossession was taking place well before the loss of the government…This dispossession isn't land, there is a dispossession in terms of social footing... Some people think that the overthrow is a major kind of watershed. I don't. I think you do lose control over our own education and that leads to loss of language and language speakers. That is probably the biggest effect. In terms of how the people were related and had access to power, I tend to think of the overthrow... as one more thing in a pattern that was established already.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 8 of 11
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Osorio, John ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: Without Hawaiʻi, without this ʻāina, we sort of exist as a people in a very pale form... We know somehow that we are a people, but I don't think that has any kind of reality without this place. I think [Hawaiʻi] gives us something to restore us and renew us, but it is something that also calls for sacrifice and protection. [Hawaiʻi] brings out these very... powerful, important kinds of human attributes. I don't think that Hawaiʻi exists without our people... You don't get to... appreciate this music without some kind of sense of what it means to be Hawaiian. It just can't be done.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Hawaiian Studies, clip 7 of 11
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Osorio, John ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: Because Writing Intensive courses, as far as I am concerned, require a reflection on writing and an ability for students to see each other's writings... I try to get students... to understand the value of taking their thoughts and organizing them in a particular way, in order to create something that speaks back. When we compose... we are speaking back to our teachers, we are speaking back to our loved ones, we are speaking back to our ancestors... I want [my students] to forsake any kind of fear about writing.