Instructor: Anne Shovic

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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Food Sciences, Health, and Nutrition, clip 17 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Shovic, Anne ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: I think the basis of this course would be pretty much the same: writing skills, how to get experience in our field, accreditation. But the specifics, in terms of population, opportunity, the desires of that individual, that's where it becomes very place-based.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Food Sciences, Health, and Nutrition, clip 16 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Shovic, Anne ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: Last spring a student shared how she was part of a home visit, and how an elderly person there was being taken advantage of by their relatives, which in their culture, that's what you do. She felt comfortable in her journal to talk about it. She did talk it over with her preceptor, and her preceptor said this is what they do in that particular culture. Journaling helps students articulate some of these [inconsistencies and cognitive disconnects]... They're definitely in another space, which is why journaling is so important, because then, I keep track of them. I know how vulnerable they are, and that's why kindness is my other huge criterion for a preceptor... Internships can be anywhere in the United States. Students must meet entrance requirements to get into program: 3.0, basic nutrition, basic chemistry and physiology, and math, before they even come in.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Food Sciences, Health, and Nutrition, clip 15 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Shovic, Anne ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: Some places, like Kokua Kalihi Valley, actually have an introductory workshop they require anyone who works with them to take. Most hospitals require a series of orientation workshops, and you have to go through a high security and information session. We go through how do you dress and the answer is whatever works in that particular spot. You can dress in whites with hairnets or in boots and jeans.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Food Sciences, Health, and Nutrition, clip 14 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Shovic, Anne ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: Students will see [cultural] differences as presented, one culture versus another culture. Those are the kinds of things that come out in their journals. Often they will not talk about it... We require that half of that journal be a reflection, and that's when it comes out.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Food Sciences, Health, and Nutrition, clip 13 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Shovic, Anne ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: I direct the dietetics program for the state of Hawaiʻi, and it's the only program that's an accredited program, and recognized by our national association, the National Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Our students graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree, and they need to go on to an internship... They still need 1200 hours, minimum, of an internship, to take the national exam to become a registered dietician... When I first came here, many years ago, it did not exist, and I realized that the students did not have a baseline of experience of what it would be like when they go into an internship program. So I required it, and initially taught it by myself... Dr. Zaleski and I have now team taught it for close to fifteen years. All students who graduate from the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources now are required to take this capstone course... They really start to develop an awareness that is reality-based as to what it is like in our profession in nutrition and dietetics. Another advantage is that it draws students together with the professionals in our community, and vice versa... I need to know that students are headed in the right direction, and the most effective way is through writing, through journaling. I ask that the students journal their experience. They do twelve journals throughout the semester, which is basically a journal a week. The first part of the journal is what has occurred, and the second part is more their reflective responses. And by reading these journals every week, I get a really good sense of what is going on. It's very place-based. The students are right next door, working in hospitals and clinics that are providing them that base for experience in our particular discipline, which is nutrition. I probably have close to 40 or 50 [sites]. Last semester I placed 25 students in an equal number of sites. I have two requirements of my preceptors: they know their stuff, but most importantly is that they're kind, that they see the student as a human being who really wants to learn... It's up to the student to contact the preceptor... credentialed professionals in our profession... Students will also go seek their own preceptors... who answer a brief evaluation.