Instructor: Manumaua (Fata) Simanu-Klutz

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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Indo-Pacific Languages, clip 16 of 16
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Simanu-Klutz, Fata ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: Regardless of language or background, the effort there is to make them understand Wendt's writings. When I deliver the sense of place, then I make it interdisciplinary... so that they all have access, whether it's world history or Samoan history... So then it's not about Samoan students but all the students.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Indo-Pacific Languages, clip 15 of 16
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Simanu-Klutz, Fata ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: During the Reagan period, they did a study of nations at risk. The study showed that students were just not writing; that they had very poor writing skills. Plane loads of teachers were going down to New Zealand, to see how New Zealand was doing the writing and reading.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Indo-Pacific Languages, clip 14 of 16
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Simanu-Klutz, Fata ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: The immersion schools were coming into focus, charter schools were coming into focus... a practice that Native Hawaiians supported; there, [students are] getting their sense of place. I didn't hear Hawaiian on this campus when I came in the '80s. By the turn of the century, it was just exciting to hear Hawaiian on this campus.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Indo-Pacific Languages, clip 13 of 16
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Simanu-Klutz, Fata ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: [Expressivist writing] is about your daily life. It's about your life experiences, different roles, so it's not necessarily about yourself, the person, but it's about what you do growing up, or interacting in the village, and those are comfortable enough for that language to emerge, or for [students] to express that in their writing. And I really believe, you start with where you are, and what you know, in order for you to be able to develop your language skills. And I think this is where our students have encountered many problems: that they are being taught content 'of another place,' if you will.
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    Instructor interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Indo-Pacific Languages, clip 12 of 16
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Simanu-Klutz, Fata ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: I've been a student at Mānoa for the last twenty years: my BA and MA were in education, and I added an MA in Pacific Island Studies, in preparation for a PhD in History... So I've gotten on the Faculty Senate, and I'm on a committee on Academic Policy and Planning, I want to add a Pacific voice not only for the Samoan students but also for the Pacific, Hawaiʻi, local Asians. In fact, the whole Hawaiʻi population needs that sense of place... for learning purposes, they need that sense of place, they need that context, where they're coming from... I was trying to make [world history] relevant [for a Chinese-background student] by asking 'what do you think was going on in China while this was happening in Europe?'... Pacific literature would not be here without looking at World History, because Pacific literature is a response to Euro-American literature and their representations of the Pacific islands... So when you talk about place, whose place do we bring in? And I think for whatever course you are teaching... an interdisciplinary approach is more sensible.