Student: Brendan Burk

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Writing Assignment Used for This Interview


Indigenous Issue Analysis Paper

This analytical paper will focus on your choice of a historical or contemporary issue that affects a particular Indigenous people of the United States, including those of Native America, Alaska, Hawaiʻi, Guam, American Samoa, Puerto Rico, the Federated States of Micronesia, Belau and the Marshall Islands, or Indigenous peoples in general.

Your paper must be typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. Times Roman font, and 4-5 pages (5-6 pages for students in Honors A) with standard 1-inch margins. All versions of the papers must be complete (typed with an introduction, an arguable thesis, supporting paragraphs providing a thorough discussion of evidence/points, and a conclusion, and using either MLA or the Chicago Style Manual citation format).

A peer review session will be scheduled on 12/3 before the final paper due date on 12/5 to help you write the best paper possible. Also, a detailed assignment description and rubric will be handed out after the midterm in class, so you will know the scope of the assignment and the criteria on which your paper will be graded.

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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in American Studies, clip 17 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Burk, Brendon ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: I took a Political Science 374 class called Law and Society and we met twice a week... We had to come to class with a full page, single-spaced writing assignment of the text that we had to read previously. We did that from the beginning of class to the end of class and that still did not constitute as a Writing Intensive.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in American Studies, clip 16 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Burk, Brendon ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: There's certain types of identification biases that people bring with them. I think for some of the non-indigenous students who are taking the class, they see the instructor is pretty indigenous looking, and I feel that could have contributed to an initial impression where they felt maybe they should censor their speech or monitor what they were saying. But by a couple weeks in, she had proven through her actions that it wasn't an absolute wall to you engaging in this discussion.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in American Studies, clip 15 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Burk, Brendon ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: I don't feel that anybody was being marginalized [in the class]... Any time that these texts were brought up in class or discussed, there was time allotted for student discussion to respond to the text or to respond to the lecture. I feel that really helped to provide a more balanced approach to the topic instead of being spoon-fed this and then leaving it without a chance to address it.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in American Studies, clip 14 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Burk, Brendon ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: Living your daily life in a certain place, in Hawaiʻi, there are certain cultural and social influences that are a part of everyday life here that I think sometimes consciously and sometimes unconsciously I bring into my assessment of whatever it is that I'm doing. I'd be more curious to see if I were to study this elsewhere, would that follow me there or would I start to think of things more in the local influences - what's important to them? What's important to people here in Hawaiʻi is not necessarily the same priorities elsewhere.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in American Studies, clip 13 of 17
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Burk, Brendon ; Henry, Jim ; Bost, Dawne
    Brief excerpt from interview: From what I've been able to collect, [Hawaiian 107] has less of a writing element [than this American Studies course] and more of a hands on approach to everything.