Family Tensions and Information Privacy: A Barrier to Diffusion of Proximity Tracing Applications?

Date
2022-01-04
Authors
Belanger, France
Crossler, Robert
Allen, Katherine R.
Resor, Jessica
Kissel, Heather A.
Finch, Travis
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Technology played a central role during the pandemic for communications and services. It was also touted as a potential solution to control the spread of COVID-19 via proximity tracing applications, also known as contact tracing (CT) apps worldwide. In non-mandated settings, however, these apps did not attain popularity. Privacy concerns were highlighted as one reason. We explored how family perceptions of CT apps can affect the family’s use of such apps. We surveyed parent-teen dyads twice over a 5-month period. We analyzed parent-teen perceptions of each other’s intentions and use of CT apps at time 1 and 2, exploring changes over time. Parents’ use intentions were influenced by their and their teens’ perceptions of the benefits but not privacy concerns. Teen intentions were influenced by their own perceptions of benefits, not their parent’s, and their parent’s concerns for the family. Intentions always influenced usage, including intentions at time 1 influencing use at time 2, demonstrating a longitudinal effect of intentions on usage existed for parents and teens.
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Digital Society, dyadic analyses, family decisions, information privacy, longitudinal study, privacy calculus
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10 pages
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Proceedings of the 55th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
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