Student: Tammy Ting-Beach

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Writing Assignment Used for This Interview


Throughout the course you will be collecting material and writing for a 15-page research paper that either visually or narratively maps a particular place of significance to you and that will in some way help you with the future work you envision for yourself. You will be designing a map that helps you to tell the multiple stories of this place. This means that when you design your map, you need to find ways to show these different layers of stories that are connected to particular sites on your map. You can hand draw or paint your map (murals as maps or art as maps), you can include little booklets that are numbered according to the sites you discuss, or you can try to design other innovate ways to communicate to your audience the significance of the place you are describing. You can also make a map video where you include interviews with people or oral recordings of the mo‘olelo.

For your three-page project proposal, I would like to see an initial bibliography of at least five entries and a description of how you will map your place. You can provide a mock-up of a map if possible, or a description of what you would like to do.

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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Upper Divison English, clip 10 of 10
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Ting-Beach, Tammy ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: I think just doing research and finding out about the place you grew up in and lived in will always stay with you... It's really interesting to look back at your work... so I feel like it's hard to put so much research and so much thought and energy into a paper when you have four other classes to balance, so I'd like to probably go back and do more research about the stream. Figure out what I can do to help, maybe figure out what I can do to fight the Kahuku fight. I don't remember [my other Writing Intensive courses]. I really don't... I remember everything about Candace's class, because they're so personal to me. The papers in the other Writing Intensives, you're writing just to write it... Some professors just want you to write what they want to hear. But Candace - she really is invested in what you have to say, and I think that's why the writing I've done for her class is so memorable, because I'm so personally invested in it. [It is inspiring to be a writer] when you're connected to the things you're writing about. At least for me. There's so much research that goes into writing a novel... but I just don't see it. Maybe that's just a testament to the good writing they do. I think that's why Professor Fujikane makes us write a moʻolelo and makes us write a connection part to our paper, so that our readers can better understand such a boring subject like stream preservation.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Upper Divison English, clip 9 of 10
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Ting-Beach, Tammy ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: I'll obviously be going back to Florida, but I've talked to my husband and we do really want to come back to Hawaiʻi. I, of course, grew up here. Love it here. Price, though. Weʻd eventually like to come back [to Hawaiʻi], but it's all about cost of living... How is it that my milk comes from the Big Island and doesn't travel as far, and it costs $6? Not sure.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Upper Divison English, clip 8 of 10
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Ting-Beach, Tammy ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: My goal is to teach English... I'd like to be teaching English one day. I myself had a really hard time with English when I was growing up. Thus, I don't even know how I became an English major. It's kinda hard being in the military. You don't really know what your life is going to be like in a year. So it's hard to make goals when you're [unsure where you'll be moved next]. Even though I want to be a teacher, my ultimate dream goal if I could attain anything in life would be write children's books. In high school, I wrote one about a girl who was afraid of sharks... My grandma says [sharks are] my ʻaumakua, but I am not testing that theory out. Because I had such a hard time in English, I wanna write books for children that would make learning fun... Eventually I'd like to teach, but I'd also like to write books. I'm not gonna be a scholarly writer... but maybe I can write a children's book and teach them about caring for the stream.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Upper Divison English, clip 7 of 10
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Ting-Beach, Tammy ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: Definitely one of the struggles I had in this class is I am a [U.S.] military wife. I am a military spouse, and it's sometimes hard to go on huakaʻi that are sponsored by people who are against the military because it reflects upon my husband, you know? How can I rely upon the military for support and yet be against them at the same time? Growing up in Hawaiʻi, when I had to bring my husband who is a military person home to my family I was like 'Oh my God, my parents are gonna kill me.' You know, in Hawaiʻi, you always grow up [learning] the military is bad... I learned so much about my classmates just personally because this class shares a lot of moʻolelo from where they personally come from. So when you're sharing about a place you come from you kind of get that bond with each other. You bond with someone when you're fighting against wind farms. I learned education can be fun. It was definitely fun in my last semester to have this class... Just to learn so much about a place you come from. I had British Literature. I had Shakespeare. I had 19th Century Literature that dealt with colonialism... When you read Shakespeare, it's not really personally connected to you... [A place-based class like Candace's] just bonds you closer to the place you come from, and it's so much easier to learn when you understand what's being presented in the class.
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    Student interview for Place-Based WAC/WID writing instruction in Upper Divison English, clip 6 of 10
    ( 2015) Place-based WAC/WID Hui ; Ting-Beach, Tammy ; Henry, Jim
    Brief excerpt from interview: Research is my weakest point, because who wants to sit there and read a bunch of numbers? I am not a scientific person... It doesn't interest me, but I know that in order to get your point across, you have to show that part in your writing. I'd rather just sit there and write about stories about growing up in Makiki Stream and Makiki area, and I'd rather just research moʻolelo from the olden days. I kinda just plow through [scientific research]... Google it and see where Google takes me. I think that's part of being an English writer, or a writer period. You have to decipher what is good information and what is bad. It's not even only Google. As Candace showed us in our class, developers can twist statistics to fit what they want it to fit. To have you think what they think about the land, but in actuality it's not like they represent [the statistics fairly]. This course really makes you look at maps. Candace showed us a map about Mauna Kea and you just look at a map like... you're just looking at the place. You're not really looking closely at the details. [Candace] would point out to us 'Oh why did they label this a wasteland?' If you closely at those things... misspellings of things on the map, and you wouldn't necessarily [notice]... [Candace] would ask you 'Why do you think it's misspelled? Does that show that this person is not from the [Native] Hawaiian community and therefore they don't understand the spelling of language and thus this map may not reflect the [Native] Hawaiian community?' Because... if they were from that community, they'd know how to spell things.