Ph.D. - East Asian Languages and Literatures (Japanese)

Permanent URI for this collection

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 10 of 29
  • Item
    Identity Construction of International Students in Japan: L2 Japanese Speakers' Meta-Awareness of Their Positioning in Interaction
    ( 2022) Hanaoka, Vera Elisabeth Wiener ; Yoshimi, Dina R. ; East Asian Language & Literature
  • Item
  • Item
  • Item
    The Usefulness of the Computer-Based Speaking Tasks of the AP Japanese Exam
    ( 2020) Suzumura, Nana ; Kondo-Brown, Kimi ; East Asian Language & Literature
  • Item
  • Item
    The Clarté Movement in Japan and Korea, 1919-1925.
    ( 2017-12) Arkenstone, Quillon B. ; East Asian Lang & Lit-Japanese
  • Item
  • Item
    Now Long Ago: Anachronism in Edo and Contemporary Japanese Literature.
    ( 2017-05) Smith, Christopher S. ; East Asian Lang & Lit-Japanese
  • Item
    A Reconstruction of Old Okinawan: A Corpus-Based Approach
    ([Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [August 2015], 2015-08) Lin, Chihkai
    The phonological inventory of Old Okinawan is often reconstructed according to modern Ryukyuan languages. Although the importance of historical resources is never ignored in the study of Okinawan historical linguistics, reconstruction based on historical sources is not well investigated yet, due to the two reasons that a) authors of previous studies mixed native historical sources with foreign historical sources in the reconstruction of Old Okinawan, and b) only sporadic examples are used for the reconstruction, and no general tendency of the examples is presented. The goal of this dissertation is to reconstruct Old Okinawan from a corpus-based approach, by concentrating on foreign sources from China and Korea in the 15th and 16th century. The two foreign sources present Old Okinawan materials transcribed by Chinese characters and Korean hangeul. The foreign sources reflect more faithfully than native sources in the phonetic value of Old Okinawan. The two types of foreign sources are first elaborated respectively, and reconstructions based on Chinese sources and Korean source will be proposed accordingly. Then entries that appear both in Chinese sources and Korean source are sorted and compared. A reconstruction on the basis of the comparison is also proposed. This dissertation concludes with a revised phonological inventory in accordance with the results achieved by internal reconstruction and the comparative method. This dissertation is the first study that limits dataset to only foreign sources from China and Korea for the reconstruction of Old Okinawan, and this dissertation is also the first one that employs a corpus-based approach to the reconstruction of Old Okinawan. The phonological inventory proposed in this dissertation will be not only a comprehensive reconstruction of Old Okinawan in the 15th and 16th century, but also a significant contribution to the study of Okinawan historical linguistics.
  • Item
    Miura Ayako the Christian Writer: A Critical Study of Her Major Novels and Their Reception in Japan
    ([Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2015], 2015-05) Woo, Patrick
    Miura Ayako (1922-1999) was one of the most successful women writers in modern Japan. Yet, despite her literary talent, Miura had until recently been labelled as “a writer of taishū bungaku,” (“mass” literature) and her works had been relegated to the periphery as “popular novels” unworthy of serious criticism or scholarship. My research project is a re-examination of the life and works of Miura Ayako and a case study of how a female Christian novelist survived and thrived in the Japanese literary world. The central thesis of my dissertation is this: “the hitherto negative reception of Miura’s novels by critics in Japan can be attributed to the obstacles she faced as a woman writer of popular novels on Christian themes, working from the off-center location of Hokkaidō.” My dissertation problematizes the distinction between junbungaku (pure literature) and taishū bungaku and questions the authority held by the maledominated bundan (literary guild) in terms of deciding what is or is not pure literature. As the critic Hirano Ken observes, by the 1930s, the notion of “pure” literature had become established by the bundan in reaction to the rising tide of mass literature. I contend that, just as shishōsetsu (autobiographical I-novel) became equated with junbungaku because it was considered more “purely Japanese,” Miura’s Christian novels had been rejected because they were viewed as “foreign” and “too far from native traditions” to be considered “pure literature.” Through a textual analysis of eight representative works by Miura, including her historical novels, I demonstrate that her novels are by no means “low-brow fiction for mere entertainment”; rather they represent serious works of fiction that explore life and human nature, rivaling the works of Mori Ōgai, Natsume Sōseki, Akutagawa Ryūnosuke and Ōe Kenzaburō who are counted among the best of modern Japanese writers. I conclude that Miura ultimately succeeded by writing novels that defy a clear distinction between the “pure” and the “mass” and by challenging some of the most basic assumptions held by the literary establishment in terms of what constitutes pure literature, who is qualified to write it, and how it should be written.