COASTAL GUARDIANS AND PRECARIOUS LIVELIHOODS: THE POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF MANGROVE NARRATIVES

dc.contributor.advisor Suryanata, Krisnawati
dc.contributor.author Rawichutiwan, Angkana
dc.contributor.department Geography
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-20T18:07:56Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-20T18:07:56Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.description.degree Ph.D.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/66234
dc.subject Geography
dc.subject environmental narratives
dc.subject livelihood
dc.subject mangrove
dc.subject political ecology
dc.subject small-scale fisheries
dc.subject Thailand
dc.title COASTAL GUARDIANS AND PRECARIOUS LIVELIHOODS: THE POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF MANGROVE NARRATIVES
dc.type Thesis
dcterms.abstract This dissertation combines the historical and ethnographical analysis to examine the mangrove narratives, discursive practices, and the impacts on the livelihoods of local communities in Thailand. Mangrove narratives are constructed generalized statements about processes and causes of, and solutions to mangrove and related environmental degradations that are accepted as the “truths” and can assumedly be applied universally. It uses a critical political ecology approach which focuses on the de/construction of orthodoxy science and environmental discourse, using mangrove narrative as a case study. The research is based on the 17 months of field research conducted in Talumphuk, the rural fishing villages in southern Thailand. It investigates the linkage between broader Thailand political economic development policies, Western ideologies and influences on Thai state, the mangrove narratives and discursive practices, and on-the-ground conditions and livelihoods of small-scale fishers. It traces the historical root of scientific forestry and institutions since the colonial period, which then passed on to the present-day mangrove management technique. It finds that mangrove narratives, created as a response to mangrove deforestation from the shrimp farming development, reinforced by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami as “coastal guardian,” have turned into discursive practices of mangrove planting and territorialization, exacerbating the already precarious livelihoods of Talumphuk fishers particularly the poor and marginalized group.
dcterms.extent 153 pages
dcterms.language eng
dcterms.publisher University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
dcterms.rights All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
dcterms.type Text
local.identifier.alturi http://dissertations.umi.com/hawii:10400
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