Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/79534

Turning Users' In-Game Behaviours into Actionable Adaptive Gamification Strategies using the PEAS Framework

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Title:Turning Users' In-Game Behaviours into Actionable Adaptive Gamification Strategies using the PEAS Framework
Authors:Loria, Enrica
Hallifax, Stuart
Altmeyer, Maximilian
Nacke, Lennart E.
Marconi, Annapaola
Keywords:Gamification
adaptive gamification
peas framework
player behaviours
tailored gamification
Date Issued:04 Jan 2022
Abstract:Adaptive gamification answers the need to customize engagement strategies because users are motivated by different game elements and mechanics. To better understand these individual preferences, user modelling is vital. However, gameful designers must make many decisions on matching profiling data to actual adaptation strategies, which makes modelling particularly challenging. The lack of a standardized and guided process for adaptive gamification hinders replicability, comparability, and complicates making adaptation dynamic. In this study, we analyzed a persuasive gameful application (Play\&Go) to show how in-game behaviours can be translated into adaptation strategies. We used an existing adaptation framework (PEAS) grounded in the games and gamification literature. Our work demonstrates the suitability of the PEAS model as a shared, standardized method for adaptive gamification and shows how it can guide the process of transforming user behaviours into actionable adaptation strategies.
Pages/Duration:10 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/79534
ISBN:978-0-9981331-5-7
DOI:10.24251/HICSS.2022.202
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections: Gamification


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