Volume 23 Number 1, February 2019 Special Issue: CALL in the Digital Wilds

Permanent URI for this collection

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 5 of 13
  • Item
    Call for papers for a special issue on Big Data in Language Education and Research
    (National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa||Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin, 2019-02-01) LLT Staff
  • Item
    Bronies learning English in the digital wild
    (National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa||Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin, 2019-02-01) Shafirova, Liudmila ; Cassany, Daniel
    This article reports on fan practices, in English, among an international community of bronies—adult fans of the animated cartoon My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic (MLP). Originally directed at a target audience of young girls, MLP has become popular among men. These older male fans have been extremely active in producing multimodal and plurilingual fan practices. We explore how two different groups of bronies—one in Russia and the other in Spain—carry out fan practices in English. Applying digital ethnography, we describe six different cases of adult MLP fans. They both consume and create products such as fanfiction, translations, and fandubbing in different contexts with the use of sophisticated technologies. Not only do fandom practices allow these fans to develop digital identities and reach new audiences, they also help them to improve their English language skills—a task at which they reveal themselves to be both autonomous and self-critical. Regarding translation practices, we note several instances of bronies receiving mentoring from fellow fans who have a higher level of English. Finally, this article points out how, in the process of adapting their written output for global readerships, bronies can acquire some important transcultural skills.
  • Item
    Quantity and diversity of informal digital learning of English
    (National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa||Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin, 2019-02-01) Lee, Ju Seong
    While research on informal digital learning of English (IDLE) increases in the fields of teaching English to speakers of other languages and computer-assisted language learning, few studies have examined the relationship between quantity and diversity of IDLE practices and different language learning outcomes. To address this gap, data were collected through one questionnaire, six English learning outcomes, and a semi-structured interview from 71 Korean English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) university students. Hierarchical linear regression analyses showed that IDLE Quantity, Age, and Major were significant predictors of two affective variables (Confidence and Enjoyment), while IDLE Diversity and Major were significantly predictive of productive language outcomes (Speaking and Productive V ocabulary Knowledge), scores in a standardized English test (TOEIC), and one affective variable (Lack of Anxiety). These results revealed how IDLE quantity and diversity can make a unique contribution to EFL learners’ English outcomes.
  • Item
    Commercial-off-the-shelf games in the digital wild and L2 learner vocabulary
    (National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa||Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin, 2019-02-01) Sundqvist, Pia
    The purposes of this study are to examine the relation between playing commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) games in the wild and L2 English vocabulary and to offer comparisons with non-gamers’ vocabulary. Data were collected from two samples of teenage L2 English learners in Sweden, Sample A (N = 1,069) and Sample B (N = 16). Questionnaires and English grades were collected from A and B, productive and receptive vocabulary tests from A, and interviews and essays from B. A quantitative-dominant mixed- methods approach was adopted. Results showed a significant positive correlation between time played and test scores. They also showed that time played was related to types of games played. Multiple regression analysis including time played and types of games as predictor variables and L2 vocabulary as the outcome variable showed that the effect from type disappeared when it was entered into the model, whereas time remained significant. A close examination of 45 words (productive test) revealed significantly higher scores for gamers (compared with non-gamers) at all vocabulary frequency levels, and for particularly difficult words. Overall, findings from Sample B regarding gaming habits and vocabulary (i.e., use of advanced or infrequent words in essays) reflected the results from Sample A, making it possible to conclude that playing COTS games matters for L2 learner vocabulary.
  • Item
    Language learning in the wild: A young user perspective
    (National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa||Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin, 2019-02-01) Hannibal Jensen, Signe
    Through the analytical lens of activity theory (Leontiev, 1978, Lantolf & Thorne, 2006), the present study investigates the uptake of affordances for language learning by young (ages 7–11) Danish children (N = 15) in their engagement with English language media in the digital wild. Drawing on ethnographic interviews (Spradley, 1979), during which the participants engaged in online English language activities (e.g., gaming, snapchatting, etc.), the study shows that most of the participants were motivated in their engagement with English by social and higher cognitive motives (Lompscher, 1999). They engaged substantially with affordances for language learning (i.e., deliberately chose English-language content over Danish), engaged in chats, and read and listened to online content. Some, on the other hand, were found to be motivated by lower cognitive motives, resulting in less engagement with the affordances. The study also found a substantial difference between perceptions of English in and outside school. The study adds new insights to an under-researched area, while giving voice to young users of English, as called for by Ushioda (2008, p. 29).