2011 EDUCATING THE FUTURE FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROFESSORATE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

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    Introduction: Foreign language graduate student professional development-past, present and future
    (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2011-01-01) Willis Allen, Heather ; Maxim, Hiram H.
    The effectiveness of professional development for future foreign language (FL) professors is more salient than ever, given the significant role played by graduate student instructors (GSIs) in undergraduate education and recent calls for change in the collegiate FL curriculum requiring sophisticated understandings of integrating the teaching of language, literature, and culture. Taking a sociocultural theory perspective, this chapter reports on a study of five FL GSIs’ experiences learning to teach that sought to determine how participation in an advanced pedagogy seminar influenced GSIs’ notions of literacy as a framing construct for collegiate FL curricula. Findings showed that through involvement in the seminar, participants progressed toward a more theoretically based definition of literacy and an awareness of its cognitive and sociocultural dimensions. However, after the seminar, not all participants demonstrated alignment in constructing their teaching practices through conceptual and pedagogical tools of literacy.
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    Video reflection in the foreign language teacher development
    (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2011-01-01) Scida, Emilia E. ; Firdyiwek, Yitna
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    Investigating foreign language graduate student instructors' perceptions and use of technology in the classroom
    (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2011-01-01) Thoms, Joshua J.
    This study investigates how graduate student instructors (GSIs) in several universities across the United States perceive and make use of technology to teach foreign language (FL) courses. Results indicate that while the majority of GSIs receive some kind of CALL training upon entering their programs, much of the training focuses on technologies that are not Web 2.0 tools (e.g., wikis, blogs, social networking sites). Specifically, participants indicate that they use PowerPoint, grammatical and lexical websites, and discussion boards most often in teaching. Survey results also suggest that lack of planning time, limited online exercises that accompany their textbook, and teaching in a classroom without media were significant factors impeding their use of technology in their courses. Suggestions are offered regarding how CALL training can be improved for GSIs to better prepare them for their future careers in academia.
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    Evolving notions of literacy-based foreign language teaching: A qualitative study of graduate student instructors
    (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2011-01-01) Willis Allen, Heather ; Dupuy, Beatrice
    The effectiveness of professional development for future foreign language (FL) professors is more salient than ever, given the significant role played by graduate student instructors (GSIs) in undergraduate education and recent calls for change in the collegiate FL curriculum requiring sophisticated understandings of integrating the teaching of language, literature, and culture. Taking a sociocultural theory perspective, this chapter reports on a study of five FL GSIs’ experiences learning to teach that sought to determine how participation in an advanced pedagogy seminar influenced GSIs’ notions of literacy as a framing construct for collegiate FL curricula. Findings showed that through involvement in the seminar, participants progressed toward a more theoretically based definition of literacy and an awareness of its cognitive and sociocultural dimensions. However, after the seminar, not all participants demonstrated alignment in constructing their teaching practices through conceptual and pedagogical tools of literacy.