ICS & LIS Faculty & Researcher Works

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    Gazing the Diversity Stance in North America: Bringing Practitioner Inquiry into the LIS Classroom
    (Association for Library and Information Science Education, 2016-04) Irvin, Vanessa
    This article is an exploration of ways in which LIS educators can consider culture, heritage, and identity as a framework for becoming participatory agents of their teaching practices in the LIS classroom. To support this framework, this discussion introduces the research methodology, practitioner inquiry, as a meaningful approach to studying pedagogical practice and identity in the LIS classroom as a means to LIS educators becoming more self-reflective and aware of the impacts of their own identity construction in their teaching. In this article I am affirming the case for a diversity stance within the North American LIS curriculum. I am also posing additional questions and challenges about LIS identity construction and professional practice as we teach and learn in the classroom.
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    First-Mover Advantage in a Social Q&A Community
    ( 2015) Gazan, Rich
    Aggregate answer ratings serve as a metric of collective intelligence in social Q&A communities. The patterns by which participants in a social Q&A community rate and recommend answers are analyzed through the lens of first-mover advantage, to address the question of whether the first answer posted has a ratings advantage over those subsequently submitted. As part of a long-term participant observation, ratings for answers submitted to the Answerbag social Q&A site were compared by order of submission and normalized for page views and answer quality. The results suggest that the first-submitted answer consistently accumulates roughly 17% more rating points than the second answer submitted, and that the rating points of each subsequent answer tend to decline. Social factors influencing rating activity and implications for interpreting future social Q&A data are discussed.
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    The Hammer of Hawking: The Impact of Celebrity Scientists, the Intent of Extraterrestrials and the Public Perception of Astrobiology
    ( 2013) Gazan, Rich
    This paper assesses the impact of theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking’s warning about the possibly malicious intent of extraterrestrial visitors on the public opinion of the search for life in the universe, which is the domain of the interdisciplinary science of astrobiology. Using Web content analysis and sentiment analysis methods, 13 distinct categories of opinion are proposed, suggesting the role of Web comments as both public forums and naturalistic data sources. The results suggest that a significant percentage of those studied agreed with Hawking purely on the merits of his reputation, but those who disagreed tended to claim that Hawking’s argument failed logically or scientifically. How cross–domain authority manifests on the Web, and the influence of celebrity scientists on the public perception of astrobiology, are discussed.
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    Identifying Crossover Documents in an Interdisciplinary Research Environment
    ( 2013) Gazan, Rich
    AIRFrame is a NASA project to analyze and integrate astrobiology documents from diverse disciplines to catalyze new knowledge. This paper outlines the technical infrastructure of the current system and reports on an ongoing iterative evaluation, to address the question of how scientists perceive and integrate crossover documents in their research. Some of the obstacles preventing AIRFrame from gaining traction with its target audience of astrobiology researchers include representing their research output accurately, effectively translating and relating diverse metadata, and understanding disciplinary norms and the broader knowledge production infrastructure. The skills required to address these needs suggest a role for both researchers and information professionals to work in tandem with technical tools to catalyze interdisciplinary knowledge. A graduate seminar in interdisciplinary knowledge production, targeted at both researchers and graduate students at the University of Hawaii, has been designed to elicit and impart needed information as input to ongoing AIRFrame development.
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