RDS Volume 13, No. 1

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    Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal Volume 13 Issue 1
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2017)
    The latest issue of the Review of Disability Studies is out! Dive into this issues' advancement of ideas from authors representing Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Hawaii, India, Norway, Sweden, and the United States. You won't want to miss this intersectionality of perspectives from scholars, educators, artist, activist, and medical practitioners all working towards advancing the study and experience of disability.
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    Editorial: What About Disability and Social Justice?
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2017) Conway, Megan A.
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    Dissertation & Abstracts v13i1
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2017) Erlen, Jonathon ; Conway, Megan
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    Three (or Infinite) Lenses: Translucent Still Life I.
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2017) Rands, Kai
    The drawing prompts the viewer’s contemplation of lenses on three different levels. (By lens, I mean a device that transforms the user's experience in some way and designates a focus.) First, disability studies serves as a lens. Simi Linton (1998) has noted that disability studies is “a prism through which one can gain a broader understanding of society and human experience” (p. 118).
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    Infusing Disability Studies within Special Education: A Personal Story
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2017) Heroux, JoDell R.
    Special education has historically been understood as a service provided to students with disabilities who are perceived to be too impaired to successfully progress in the general education curriculum and classroom. This perception has been reinforced through teacher preparation programs that rely heavily on the medical model of disability to prepare both special and general education teachers. While there is an increased push both legislatively and socially for more inclusive practices in education, this over-reliance on the medical model does little to nurture inclusive attitudes and worse, perpetuates deficit assumptions of disability. This paper seeks to explore how the infusion of Disability Studies into the teacher preparation curriculum might be used to foster more inclusive attitudes.