How Doxing on Social Media Leads to Social Stigma and Perceived Dignity

Date
2024-01-03
Authors
Shan, Guohou
Pu, Wenxi
Thatcher, Jason Bennet
Roth, Philip
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106
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Abstract
Doxing is the practice of publicly postings someone else's personal information online (e.g., on social media) without their consent. Doxing on social media can damage the social image of doxing victims (doxees). Three types of doxing (deanonymizing, targeting, and delegitimizing) are documented in the literature. To better understand and mitigate the harmful consequences, in this research, we use social identity threat theory to propose a research model. We aim to understand whether doxing leads to social stigma and loss of perceived dignity, whether types of doxing result in different outcomes, and to unpack the mechanisms of doxing impact. Through two online experiments, we establish that doxing leads to social stigma and loss of perceived dignity; only delegitimizing doxing matters and perceived trustworthiness can help explain the effects of doxing on perceived dignity, but not on social stigma.Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in the paper.
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Adversarial Behavior in Collaboration and Social Media Systems, doxing, social stigma, dignity threat, social identity threat theory, perceived trustworthiness.
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10 pages
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Proceedings of the 57th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
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