Questions, curiosities, and concerns: talking points for data citation and attribution

Date
2017-01-06
Authors
Henke, Ryan
Dailey, Meagan
Hooshiar, Kavon
Contributor
Advisor
Department
Instructor
Depositor
Speaker
Researcher
Consultant
Interviewer
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Volume
Number/Issue
Starting Page
Ending Page
Alternative Title
Abstract
Changing the way linguists approach data citation and attribution means changing the way we traditionally think about data, their role in research, and their scholarly value. We are accustomed to valuing only particular academic products, even though we invest just as much time, effort, and analytical skill into collecting and managing the data behind published products. Efforts to redress this status quo proceed on a variety of fronts, but none of these efforts will happen overnight. Furthermore, not all of these conversations will be smooth conversions of viewpoints and philosophies. Changing minds takes time and patience, especially when navigating decades of thought and practice. This poster presents some questions, curiosities, and concerns that have been raised during conversations about changing standards and practices for data citation and attribution. Following the tradition in public relations and politics, we offer talking points for conveying a helpful and hopeful message to colleagues.
Description
Poster: Changing the way linguists approach data citation and attribution means changing the way we traditionally think about data, their role in research, and their scholarly value. We are accustomed to valuing only particular academic products, even though we invest just as much time, effort, and analytical skill into collecting and managing the data behind published products. Efforts to redress this status quo proceed on a variety of fronts, but none of these efforts will happen overnight. Furthermore, not all of these conversations will be smooth conversions of viewpoints and philosophies. Changing minds takes time and patience, especially when navigating decades of thought and practice. This poster presents some questions, curiosities, and concerns that have been raised during conversations about changing standards and practices for data citation and attribution. Following the tradition in public relations and politics, we offer talking points for conveying a helpful and hopeful message to colleagues.
Keywords
data citation, attribution, Linguistics
Citation
Extent
1
Format
Geographic Location
Time Period
Related To
Rights
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
Rights Holder
Email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.