Ultraviolet Vision in Larval Stomatopod Crustaceans: Anatomy, Physiology, and Behavior

Date
2022
Authors
McDonald, Marisa Sarah
Contributor
Advisor
Porter, Megan L.
Department
Marine Biology
Instructor
Depositor
Speaker
Researcher
Consultant
Interviewer
Annotator
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Volume
Number/Issue
Starting Page
Ending Page
Alternative Title
Abstract
The eyes of the stomatopod crustacean are considered one of the most complex in the animal kingdom, with the most diverse array of photoreceptors known. While these have been the basis of many studies, the larval eye is still minimally understood. In the marine environment, differing light environments and ecological demands between larvae and adults leads to developmental shifts in visual system form and function. It not uncommon for crustaceans to have a simpler eye adapted to the pelagic environment they inhabit, while adults develop more complex eyes, typically expanding upon larval structures and shifting photoreceptor sensitivities during metamorphosis. Larval stomatopods are relatively unique, as instead of expanding upon the existing structure, the larval retina is fully replaced upon metamorphosis making the larval eye physiologically and morphologically distinct from the adult eye. Previous studies have described larval stomatopod eyes as comparatively simple with a near-spherical, uniform eye composed of a single blue-green photoreceptor type. However, recent studies have suggested that the larval visual system is likely far more complex than once understood. This dissertation expanded the capabilities of larval eyes in stomatopods morphologically, physiologically, and behaviorally, with a focus on characterizing the function and ecological role of UV vision. Here, I present morphological evidence that R8 photoreceptors, the ultrastructure responsible for UV vision in adult photoreceptors, are present in larval stomatopods. Additionally, I present physiological and behavioral evidence that larval stomatopods have three distinct spectral classes, including a UV spectral class, and can both see and are attracted to UV light. Finally, we tested the effect of light environment on feeding rates in larval stomatopods, and found that day and twilight are optimal times, and there is some suggestion that UV vision could be aiding in feeding in at least one species of larval stomatopods.
Description
Keywords
Biology, behavior, electrophysiology, microscopy, stomatopod, ultraviolet, vision
Citation
Extent
205 pages
Format
Geographic Location
Time Period
Related To
Table of Contents
Rights
All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Rights Holder
Local Contexts
Email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.