Reporting behavior problems as a function of reporting method in a primary care setting among females of Asian, Pacific Islander, and White descent in Hawaiʻi

dc.contributor.author Yoshioka, Dawn T. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-07-22T00:11:58Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-22T00:11:58Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.description Thesis (M.A.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2008. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 31-37). en_US
dc.description vi, 37 leaves, bound 29 cm en_US
dc.description.abstract Objective: To determine the degree to which the rate and severity of reporting behavior problems by female patients of Asian, Pacific Islander, and White descent in a primary care setting are affected by the method of reporting (written vs. oral). Methods: Female primary care adult outpatients at a university health clinic were screened for behavior problems by either a written or interview method using the three scales (Morale, Global Impairment, and Global Symptoms) of the Health Dynamics Inventory-Self Report Form (Saunders & Wojcik, 2004). Data were collected on 316 participating, eligible patients (132 females of Asian descent, 51 females of Pacific Islander descent, and 133 females of White descent). Results: A 3 x 2 ANOV A analyses indicated significant main effects for group, method of reporting, and group by method interaction of female patients reporting behavior problems. Additional post-hoc procedures found a significant difference in the method of reporting among female patients of Asian descent in the Global Impairment Scale in which the written self-report scores of this group were significantly higher than the faceto- face oral interview format in reporting behavior problems. There was also a significant difference in Global Impairment Scale scores between the written method of reporting behavior problems by female patients of Asian descent and the interview method by female patients of White descent. Conclusions: This study suggests the level of reporting behavior problems by female patients in a primary care setting may depend on the self-identified racial group of the patient and the context in which the information is collected. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20850
dc.language.iso en-US en_US
dc.relation Theses for the degree of Master of Arts (University of Hawaii at Manoa). Psychology; no. 3535 en_US
dc.rights All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner. en_US
dc.title Reporting behavior problems as a function of reporting method in a primary care setting among females of Asian, Pacific Islander, and White descent in Hawaiʻi en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.type.dcmi Text en_US
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