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Ho'ala Hou O Na Wahine Maoli: Reawakening of Native Hawaiian Women Exploring the Pathways to Posttraumatic Growth and Healing of formerly incarcerated Native Hawaiian female trauma survivors

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Title:Ho'ala Hou O Na Wahine Maoli: Reawakening of Native Hawaiian Women Exploring the Pathways to Posttraumatic Growth and Healing of formerly incarcerated Native Hawaiian female trauma survivors
Authors:Martin, Tammy Kaho'olemana Kahalaopuna
Contributors:Godinet, Meripa (advisor)
Social Work (department)
Keywords:Social work
Women's studies
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Trauma research has historically focused on the negative outcomes of adversity. Although trauma can have devastating effects, growth can also arise in one’s life through overcoming life’s challenges. Posttraumatic Growth (PTG), the positive psychological change and personal transformation that often occurs as a result of processing through trauma offers hope that individuals can and often do overcome adversity. To honor the 10 Native Hawaiian women’s leo (voices) and mo‘olelo (personal narratives), this study used semi-structured interviewing to: 1) better understand the pathways and processes to achieve PTG and healing across the life span for Native Hawaiian female trauma survivors who have been incarcerated across the life span; and 2) identify factors that contribute to healing and PTG for these women, including Native Hawaiian ethnic identity, class, gender, trauma, interpersonal violence, and incarceration. A grounded theory approach was employed along with Nohona Hawai‘i as a complimentary methodology that actualizes the Hawaiian epistemological and ontological viewpoints.
The study found that pathways to healing are not linear, yet rather a process of a gradual ascension in conscious awakening as actions are taken, internal intellectualization occurs, insight is gained, release of hurt from the past occurs and reconnections are made to self, others, and culture. A three-phase dynamic conceptual model is presented to describe the interactive processes that occurred for the women in this study as they moved between Naʻaupō (“Night” mind ), Huliau (Time of Transformative Change), and Naʻauao (“Daylight” mind). Three major motivations to change were critical during the Huliau phase: ʻIʻini Hulihia (Desire to Overturn); ʻŌlelo Hoʻohiki (Conscious Commitment Ensures Accountability); and Hoʻomana (Being Spirit-Led versus Ego-Driven). Core factors that supported their overall transformation process include: a meaningful spiritual belief system, multiple trustworthy support networks, making conscious commitments to change, receiving and giving love, acceptance/recognition, forgiveness, cultural reclamation, education, and reflection time.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:396 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63263
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Social Work


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