The effect of cultural orientations of individuals on intercultural sensitivity and communication predispositions in the U.S. college classroom context

Date
2013-05
Authors
Kuioka, Aki Leslie
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
[Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2013]
Abstract
This study examines the relationships between individuals with different cultural orientations (bicultural, independent, interdependent, and marginal) proposed by Kim et al. (1996) and intercultural sensitivity and perceived communication predispositions (classroom communication apprehension and argumentativeness). Cultural orientations of individuals were treated as rank-ordering (Bicultural = 4, Independent = 3, Interdependent = 2, and Marginal = 1). In the hypothesized path model, it is expected that one's bicultural level increases one's level of intercultural sensitivity, which, in turn, leads to a higher degree of argumentativeness and a lower level of classroom communication apprehension. Similarly, it is hypothesized that one's bicultural level decreases one's level of intercultural sensitivity, which, in turn, leads to a lower degree of argumentativeness and a higher level of classroom communication apprehension. Data to test the model were drawn from both the undergraduate and graduate East Asian international students studying in Hawaii. The data were partially consistent with the theoretical prediction made. The implications of the results for theory and practice are discussed.
Description
Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2013.
Includes bibliographical references.
Keywords
communication
Citation
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