Children and Family, 1999 - present

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    Strong Families
    (University of Hawaii, 1991-07) Lingren, Herbert G.
    It is a small miracle that strong families exist today. They get little positive attention in the media and little support from our society. Family researchers have established some criteria for identifying strong families. First, family members are able to cope with stress and problems in an efficient and effective way. Second, a strong family has and uses coping resources both within the family and outside the family. Third, strong families have the ability to end up being more cohesive, more flexible, and more satisfied as a result of effectively overcoming stress and problems.
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    Self-Esteem in Children
    (University of Hawaii, 1991-04) Lingren, Herbert G.
    Self-esteem is a person’s understanding of how valuable he or she is in the world. Many family scientists consider self-esteem to be the single most important factor in shaping a person’s life. Self-esteem is a family affair. It is in the family that we first decide who we are and how to be that way. Therefore, parents—and other primary caregivers—are powerful examples in the development of high self-esteem in children.
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    Helping Youth in High-Risk Situations
    (University of Hawaii, 1991-04) Lingren, Herbert G.
    Youth today are at risk because of a host of family, personality, and situational factors. Most adolescents face the stresses of rapid developmental changes and challenging life events constructively. But significant numbers of others rely on passive, withdrawing, aggressive, or other destructive or negative behaviors in their attempts to deal with their problems. Often adults, or even the adolescent’s friends, are not readily available to help when needed.To help youth in high risk situations. you need to have four interrelated qualities: trustworthiness. genuineness. empathy. and honesty.
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    Myths and Facts about Aging
    (University of Hawaii, 1991-07) Lingren, Herbert G.
    There are probably more myths about older people and aging than there are about any other stage of people’s lives. These myths are perpetuated by television programs, magazines, newspapers, and all parts of our society. We must continue to fight the myths of ageism and become knowledgeable about this stage of life called late adulthood. This period of our lives could be the most satisfying of all.
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    Youth at Risk
    (University of Hawaii, 1991-04) Llngren, Herbert G.
    The period of life between 12 and 18 is characterized by rapid physical growth, emotional ups and downs, and the need to learn adult behaviors. For many young people, though, life is a painful struggle, with mixed messages and conflicting demands. A teenager who has inadequate resources and support to cope with those demands will experience stress overload, which may lead to non-helpful and even destructive behaviors.
University of Hawaii