Biotechnology, 2002 - present

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 12
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    Somatic embryogenesis from mature Bambusa ventricosa
    (University of Hawaii, 2011-08) Cheah, Kheng T. ; Chaille, Lee C.
    This paper describes a bamboo tissue culture protocol based on explants from mature plants that minimizes the browning and rooting problems identified as bottlenecks in previous methods. The positive results of this initial research can be further optimized for commercial application.
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    Construction of Automatic Bell Siphons for Backyard Aquaponic Systems
    (University of Hawaii, 2010-06) Fox, Bradley K. ; Howerton, Robert ; Tamaru, Clyde S.
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    How to Cultivate Indigenous Microorganisms
    (University of Hawaii, 2008-08) Park, Hoon ; DuPonte, Michael W.
    In Korea and other Asian countries, deliberate collection and culturing of naturally occurring soil organisms and their application to crop soils is believed to minimize the need for applications of inorganic soil amendments. While there is little scientific data to verify the benefits of this practice, the publication provides step-by-step descriptions and illustrations of the process.
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    Preparing Tissue-Cultured Banana Plantlets for Field Planting
    (University of Hawaii, 2008-03) Perez, Eden A. ; Hooks, Cerruti R2
    This publication describes basic requirements for preparing tissue-cultured banana plantlets in greenhouse nurseries and for field planting. To help growers fight the spread of banana bunchy top virus and mitigate its negative impact on the Hawai‘i banana industry, the CTAHR Agricultural Diagnostic Service Center will have tissue-cultured banana plants available for purchase as part of its seed distribution program.
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    How to Cultivate Indigenous Microorganisms
    (University of Hawaii, 2008-08) Park, Hoon ; DuPonte, Michael W.
    In Asian countries, deliberate collection and culturing of naturally occurring soil microorganisms has been a common agricultural practice for centuries, and application of these cultures to crop soils is believed to minimize the need for applications of inorganic soil amendments. However, little scientific documentation of the benefits of these practices exists. This publication outlines the principal steps in culturing naturally occurring microorganisms in a process similar to one used on farms in Korea.
University of Hawaii