RDS Volume 4, No. 1

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    Book Review: The Truth of Music: Empire, Law, and Secrecy
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2008) Schmalenberger, Sarah
    Author: Henry Kingsbury Reviewer: Sarah Schmalenberger Publisher: Full Court Press, 2005 Paper, ISBN: 0-9769269-0-3, 135 pages Cost: $14.45USD
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    Music Review: Nutters with Attitude
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2008) Walker, Lizzie
    Artist: Various, for Mad Pride Reviewer: Lizzie Walker, postgraduate student, Centre for Disability Studies, Leeds University Produced: 2001 Cost: £4.50 UK & EU (incl. Postage)/£5 international plus 30% for airmail http://www.activedistribution.org/index.php or ACTIVE DISTRIBUTION, BM ACTIVE, LONDON, WC1N 3XX, UK
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    Book Review: Sounding Off: Theorizing Disability in Music
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2008) Schwandt, Kevin
    Editors: Neil Lerner and Joseph N. Straus. Foreword by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson. Reviewer: Kevin Schwandt, School of Music, University of Minnesota Publisher: Routledge, 2006 Paper, ISBN: 0-415-97907-2, 312 pages.
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    Life and Livelihood: Musicians Coping with Breast Cancer
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2008) Schmalenberger, Sarah
    Cancer survivorship -- an emerging research field, may be particularly helpful in understanding the physical effects of breast cancer and treatment on musicians. The National Cancer Institute reports that breast cancer survivors comprise the largest cohort of documented cancer survivors in the United States overall, representing 40% of female survivors. Nevertheless, the problems routinely encountered by breast cancer patients following treatment – such as lymph edema, post-surgical neuropathy, shoulder morbidity, post-radiation contracture, chronic fatigue, immune deficiency, and chronic pain – have not been extensively studied. Problems routinely encountered by breast cancer patients – such as lymph edema, post-surgical neuropathy, shoulder morbidity, post-radiation contracture, chronic fatigue, immune deficiency, and chronic pain – may be especially burdensome to musicians. Musicians depend upon their torsos and arms in their professional work, precisely the areas most affected by surgical procedures and adjuvant therapies. From holding an instrument to using lungs and arms to produce sound, a woman’s torso is the core of her livelihood. Performing arts medicine, a discipline derived from sports and occupational medicine, could easily support studies in rehabilitative health for breast cancer patients. As yet, however, no one has studied the problem of musician’s injuries from a non-occupational catalyst. Research into the long-term medical and occupational impact of breast cancer is needed so that best practices – both in treatment and rehabilitation – can be identified and developed, to bring about best outcomes for all patients, including, specifically, women musicians. The Life and Livelihood Study, commencing in September 2007, seeks to understand issues faced by women musicians with breast cancer, and clarify how the care of such women can be improved. This qualitative study will develop a profile of the impact of breast cancer and medical treatment for breast cancer on women musicians, toward facilitating a broader understanding of breast cancer survivorship issues in general. This essay describes the research problem of musicians' survivorship after breast cancer, and argues for further examination of the impact of breast cancer not only on musicians, but also on those in other fields where physical fitness, strength, and stamina are vital to occupational and general well-being.
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    The Implementation of Batia Strauss's Method of Active Listening to Music with Didactic and Therapeutic Aims during Music Classes in Polish Public Schools
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2008) Gozdecka, Renata
    The article chronicles the implementation of Active Listening to Music, a pedagogical method developed by Batia Strauss that has become extremely popular in Poland in recent years. Strauss, working at Levinsky College for Teachers in Tel Aviv and managing the Branch of Music Teaching at the Jerusalem Music Academy, led workshops for a wide circle of participants worldwide. This article includes aims and forms of music therapy as used in Polish schools, a description of the method of Batia Strauss, particularly its therapeutic features, and means of implementation of elements of Strauss’s method through a variety of music therapy techniques as adapted in Poland.