RDS Volume 8, No. 3

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    Disability Studies Dissertation Abstracts
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2012) Erlen, Jonathon
    The information for this section of RDS is provided by Jonathon Erlen of the University of Pittsburgh. A full list of disability-related dissertation abstracts may be found at http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/guides/histmed/dissertations/
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    Book Review: Surprised to be Standing: A Spiritual Journey
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2012) Kemp, Janine Bertram
    Title: Surprised to be Standing: A Spiritual Journey Author: Steven E. Brown Reviewer: Janine Bertram Kemp Publisher: Honolulu, HI: Healing Light, 2011 Paper: ISBN: 13: 978-1456521691 Cost: $19.95, 218 pages
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    Book Review: Arts, Culture, and Blindness: A Study of Blind Students in the Visual Arts
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2012) Reid, Katherine
    Title: Arts, Culture, and Blindness: A Study of Blind Students in the Visual Arts Author: Simon Hayhoe Reviewer: Katherine Reid Publisher: New York: Teneo Press, 2008 ISBN: 978-1-934844-07-6 Soft Cover: $30.00, 193 pages
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    Supporting Graduate Students toward “A Pedagogy of Hope”: Resisting and Redefining Traditional Notions of Disability
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2012) Hove, Geert Van ; Schauwer, Elisabeth De ; Mortier, Kathleen ; Claes, Lien ; Munck, Katrien De ; Verstichele, Meggie ; Vandekinderen, Caroline ; Leyman, Karen ; Thienpondt, Leen
    This article describes the process by which faculty at Ghent University enculturate graduate students into a Disability Studies in Education (DSE) perspective within a culture that actively supports segregation of students with disabilities. Our curriculum centers around “a pedagogy of hope”—a way of thinking and working in which problems, solutions, and roles are defined differently from the traditional models of disability. To illustrate this work, we present five key incidents (real-life vignettes) that have occurred within the day-to-day interactions with the students and analyze the significance of these incidents in regard to student growth. We conclude with a discussion of ten basic elements of DSE that are central to research, teaching, and action.
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    “What...[thought] cannot bear to know”: Crippin’ the Limits of “Thinkability”
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies, 2012) Erevelles, Nirmala
    In this essay, I show how disability studies scholarship can challenge normative ways of thinking in higher educational contexts. I call this “crippin’ the limits of thinkability.” To make this argument, I draw on one pedagogical context, the course Multicultural Education for Leadership Personnel, offered to nurse educators enrolled in a doctoral degree in Instructional Leadership offered jointly through the College of Education and the College of Nursing in the university where I teach. In this course, through disability studies scholarship, students came to interrogate their own socialization into authority-based practices intimately tied to the positivist claims of evidence-based research. Thus, in this paper, I use queer theory and crip theory to describe three methods: the study of limits, the study of ignorance, and the study of reading practice (Britzman, 1998) to illustrate how disability studies scholarship enabled students to critically reflect on the knowledge of bodies and the bodies of knowledge manifested in nursing pedagogy and curriculum.