Asian Perspectives, 2001 - Volume 40, Number 2 (Fall)

Permanent URI for this collection

Asian Perspectives is the leading peer-reviewed archaeological journal devoted to the prehistory of Asia and the Pacific region. In addition to archaeology, it features articles and book reviews on ethnoarchaeology, palaeoanthropology, physical anthropology, and ethnography of interest and use to the prehistorian. International specialists contribute regional reports summarizing current research and fieldwork, and present topical reports of significant sites. Occasional special issues focus on single topics.

News

For subscription information please contact:
University of Hawai’i Press
Journals Department
2840 Koowalu St.
Honolulu, HI 96822
http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 5 of 9
  • Item
  • Item
    Excavations at the Kipapa Rockshelter, Kahikinui, Maui, Hawai'i
    (University of Hawai'i Press (Honolulu), 2001) Jones O'Day, Sharyn
    Test excavations of a late precontact to early contact rockshelter site in the traditional district of Kahikinui, Maui, Hawai'i, are discussed. The excavated cultural deposits primarily consist of three combustion features, two informal fire pits, and an earth oven. The deposit contained indigenous Hawaiian artifacts, such as basalt lithics, bone awls, and a fishhook. Fine-screening methods were employed with the use of kin. (1.59 mm) mesh, and relatively large amounts of fish bone and microfauna were also recovered. Using faunal and material culture evidence, it is argued that the rockshelter is a single component of a traditional Hawaiian household complex (kau hale), probably a cookhouse (hale kahumu). KEYWORDS: Hawai'i, Maui Island, archaeology, screen size, zooarchaeology, fauna, kau hale.
  • Item
    Early Settlement of Rapa Nui (Easter Island)
    (University of Hawai'i Press (Honolulu), 2001) Martinsson-Wallin, Helene ; Crockford, Susan J.
    Extensive archaeological investigations on Rapa Nui were initiated by the Norwegian Expedition to the island in 1955-1956. An evaluation of the evidence for early settlement and discussion of the origin of the initial population are presented. The earliest settlement activity on the island was subsequently found at Anakena cove during the Kon-Tiki Museum expedition in 1987. A reanalysis of the material remains and a new osteological analysis of the fish remains from the early Anakena site are presented. This, together with analyses of cultural remains from other settlement sites on Rapa Nui and on other islands in Polynesia, forms the base for an intra- and interisland comparative analysis and discussion of the origin of the initial settlement on Rapa Nui. KEYWORDS: Rapa Nui, settlement, origin, comparative analysis, osteological analysis, fish bones.
  • Item
    Contained Identities: The Demise of Yapese Clay Pots
    (University of Hawai'i Press (Honolulu), 2001) Descantes, Christophe
    The loss of ceramic technology is Widespread in Oceanic island societies. While this disappearance has taken place at different times, under different conditions, on different Pacific Islands, a model created by examining the technology loss of one society may cast light on the contributing factors to the decline of ceramic production of other Oceanic contexts. A model to account for the relatively recent end of ceramic pot production and use on the island of Yap, Federated States of Micronesia, during the colonial period is offered. Ceramic manufacture on Yap was at least a 2000-year-old tradition before it ceased in the twentieth century. Relying on a historical approach that considers the social dynamics of pots and a combination of archaeological, ethnographic, and ethnohistoric records, the Yapese gradually replaced their ceramic vessel technology with metal pots because of new conditions encountered during contact and colonialism. Factors involved in the ease of replacement of ceramic pots include limited access to the specialized labor required to produce ceramic containers, the superior durability offered by the replacement technology, and the fact that ceramic pots were valued more for their function. KEYWORDS: Yap, pottery, ceramic change, colonialism.
  • Item
    Introductory Routes of Rice to Japan: An Examination of the Southern Route Hypothesis
    (University of Hawai'i Press (Honolulu), 2001) Takamiya, Hiroto
    The beginning of rice agriculture in Japan impacted every aspect of life in most parts of the archipelago. It was the Japanese version of the "Neolithic Revolution." Because rice is so important today for Japanese and thought to have been so since the Yayoi period, when and how rice agriculture began in Japan has been intensively studied. Accordingly, three hypotheses, (1) Northern, (2) Chanjian (central coastal China), and (3) Southern routes have been proposed. The third hypothesis was originally proposed by the well-known ethnologist Kunio Yanagita in 1952. Since then, many scholars have attempted to examine this hypothesis. The possibility of this hypothesis based on archaeological, botanical, and ethnological data that have been accumulated in the last fifty years is summarized. Direct data, plant remains that I was able to collect and analyze to test this hypothesis are evaluated. The archaeobotanical data suggest that food production began on the island of Okinawa from the eighth to tenth centuries A.D. and foragers were living on the island during the Yayoi period. The data thus agree with archaeological data and the Southern route hypothesis is rejected. KEYWORDS: origins of rice agriculture in Japan, the Southern route, archaeobotanical data, Ryukyu archipelago, Okinawa.
Copyright by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.