Honors Projects for Women's Studies

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    A Case for the Redemptive Eve
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2014-09-26) Brown, Ruth ; Women's Studies
    It took me a long time to decide to write this thesis. More than seventeen years as a "good" daughter, more than thirty years as a "good" wife, and almost ten years of changing. My present status is that of a "changing woman": changing into a liberated person -- not afraid of taking a chance, not afraid to make a mistake, not afraid to make people dislike her. Even though I grew up with images of liberated women: Jane Addams, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Josephine Roche -- I never applied the images to myself. The moment I began to change was very recent. It was the day a sheet of paper crossed my desk: Executive Order 11375, amending Executive Order 11246, explicitly prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex in the Federal Government. In my inner soul I had known for years that I was being discriminated against, but to have the government actually agree! I was filled with questions: How were women in other countries faring? What were they doing and saying? Were we all in it together and could we all be liberated together?
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    Animated Misogyny: The Disney World of Gender
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2014-09-26) Bactista, Cheryl ; Ferguson, Kathy ; Women's Studies
    Folk and fairy tales throughout history have served the purposes of alluding to the generally held beliefs within a culture and passing this belief system on to subsequent generations (Bottigheimer, 119). From the oral histories of pre-historic ages to the early writings of the ancient Chinese to the interpretations of the Brothers Grimm to the court tellings of Charles Perrault and beyond, the form and content of these tales has been adapted to reflect, reinforce and recreate the culture of the time. Likewise, critical interpretations have been applied to those writings by individuals in various disciplines who seek to gain insight into the development of these tales and their impact on the societies around them. In the latter part of this century, much of this criticism has centered around psychoanalytic theories with an emphasis on child development. From Spock to Erikson to Bettelheim, those concerned with the developing child have expounded on the possible impacts of folk and fairy tales on the young mind. Since the 1970s, with the re-emergence of the women's movement, feminists have begun to explore the implications of these works for young girls within the framework of a patriarchal society.