Sustainable Taro Culture: Fiji Situation

dc.contributor.author Vilsoni, F. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-11-29T01:44:34Z
dc.date.available 2008-11-29T01:44:34Z
dc.date.issued 1993-01 en_US
dc.description.abstract Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is known to the Fijians by ten different names and is cultivated by people who lived in physically isolated communities for centuries. To the indigenous people, taro is important in their culture. Taro is the most common aroid cultivated by farmers. The demand for taro, especially at the festive Christmas period, appears to be inelastic, as consumers purchase taro regardless of the high prices. Apart from the corm, taro leaves of certain varieties are particularly esteemed as a green vegetable. With the increase in demand for food as a result of population pressure, the practice of shifting cultivation is giving way to intensive taro culture. en_US
dc.format.extent 4 pages en_US
dc.identifier.citation Vilsoni F. 1993. Sustainable taro culture: Fiji situation. In: Ferentinos L, editor. Proceedings of the Sustainable Taro Culture for the Pacific Conference. Sustainable Taro Culture for the Pacific Conference; 1992 Sept 24-25; Honolulu, Hawaii. Honolulu (HI): University of Hawaii. p. 84-87. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0271-9916 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/4095
dc.language.iso en-US en_US
dc.publisher University of Hawaii en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Research Extension Series en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries 140 en_US
dc.rights.holder University of Hawaii en_US
dc.subject Colocasia esculenta en_US
dc.subject Fiji en_US
dc.subject taro en_US
dc.title Sustainable Taro Culture: Fiji Situation en_US
dc.type Other en_US
dc.type.dcmi Text en_US
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