ʻIKE ʻ INA KŪPUNA BASED EDUCATION APPLYING HAWAIIAN FRAMEWORK AS A TOOL IN THE CURRICULUM

Date
2021
Authors
Irvine, Aliah
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Abstract
The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of a Hawaiian culturally responsive, place-based education curriculum on student learning and engagement. ʻIke ʻāina kūpuna based education is a Hawaiian ancestral knowledge framework drawing on Hawaiian cultural practices such as kilo, kanu, oli, mele, kumulipo, and hei, kuahu, and hale building to engage students in science education. This study was conducted at schools across the Waiʻanae Coast, working with Waiʻanae Intermediate School science department and teachers as well as Nānākuli High and Intermediate School Hoʻopulapula Academy students and teachers. Data included both qualitative and quantitative methods, e.g., photographs, interviews, student writings, surveys, and focus groups using outdoor activities like gardening and outplanting as a tool to understand what impact incorporating ʻike ʻāina kūpuna based education has on students. Data and analysis revealed that learning through a hands-on, Hawaiian place-based curriculum grounded in using Hawaiian ancestral knowledge had positive outcomes for students. Students loved learning in their garden and enjoyed learning about Hawaiian culture. The findings have implications for researchers and educators who are considering using a Hawaiian place-based curriculum framework.
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