#KeepOurLanguagesStrong: Indigenous Language Revitalization on Social Media during the Early COVID-19 Pandemic

dc.contributor.author Chew, Kari A. B.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-04-11T05:45:36Z
dc.date.available 2021-04-11T05:45:36Z
dc.date.issued 2021-04
dc.description.abstract Indigenous communities, organizations, and individuals work tirelessly to #KeepOurLanguagesStrong. The COVID-19 pandemic was potentially detrimental to Indigenous language revitalization (ILR) as this mostly in-person work shifted online. This article shares findings from an analysis of public social media posts, dated March through July 2020 and primarily from Canada and the US, about ILR and the COVID-19 pandemic. The research team, affiliated with the NEȾOLṈEW̱ “one mind, one people” Indigenous language research partnership at the University of Victoria, identified six key themes of social media posts concerning ILR and the pandemic, including: 1. language promotion, 2. using Indigenous languages to talk about COVID-19, 3. trainings to support ILR, 4. language education, 5. creating and sharing language resources, and 6. information about ILR and COVID-19. Enacting the principle of reciprocity in Indigenous research, part of the research process was to create a short video to share research findings back to social media. This article presents a selection of slides from the video accompanied by an in-depth analysis of the themes. Written about the pandemic, during the pandemic, this article seeks to offer some insights and understandings of a time during which much is uncertain. Therefore, this article does not have a formal conclusion; rather, it closes with ideas about long-term implications and future research directions that can benefit ILR.
dc.description.sponsorship National Foreign Language Resource Center
dc.format.extent 28 pages
dc.identifier.citation Chew, Kari A. B. 2021. #KeepOurLanguagesStrong: Indigenous Language Revitalization on Social Media during the Early COVID-19 Pandemic. Language Documentation & Conservation 15: 239-266.
dc.identifier.issn 1934-5275
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/24976
dc.language.iso en-US
dc.publisher University of Hawaii Press
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject Indigenous language revitalization
dc.subject COVID-19
dc.subject social media
dc.title #KeepOurLanguagesStrong: Indigenous Language Revitalization on Social Media during the Early COVID-19 Pandemic
dc.type Article
dc.type.dcmi Text
prism.endingpage 266
prism.publicationname Language Documentation & Conservation
prism.startingpage 239
prism.volume 15
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