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UNDERGRADUATE HEALTH RESEARCH TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR RACIALLY AND ETHNICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES

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Title:UNDERGRADUATE HEALTH RESEARCH TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR RACIALLY AND ETHNICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
Authors:Soong, Shelley
Contributors:Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe‘aimoku (advisor)
Public Health (department)
Keywords:Public health
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Three studies were conducted for this dissertation around the broader topic of improving undergraduate health research training programs for Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Peoples (NHOPP), and increasing the likelihood of NHOPP pursuing health science research careers. The first study systematically examined existing published literature on undergraduate health research training programs for racially and ethnically underrepresented students in the sciences. The second study took a closer look at research participation among underrepresented students in the health sciences, and examined the prevalence of research participation and sociodemographic and academic correlates of undergraduate research participation at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UH) through a secondary data analysis of UH data. The third study dove deeper into this topic and, through qualitative interviews with established NHOPP health science researchers, examined the facilitators and barriers of establishing a research career.
Results of the systematic literature review indicated common program components of undergraduate health research training programs for students from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups include individual research experiences, mentorship, and financial support. The studies with the highest number of training components were programs specifically targeting American Indian undergraduate students, and these programs incorporated American Indian philosophies into the development and design of their programs. Although results from the secondary data analysis did not reveal any significant differences in research participation among Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders and other racial and ethnic groups, Asian students were found to participate in significantly less research than white students. The data analysis also revealed that academically higher achieving undergraduate students (e.g., students with grades of mostly As and Bs) participated in research at a higher rate than average or lower achieving students (e.g., students with grades of mostly Cs or lower); in addition, students with the educational aspiration of a doctoral degree were significantly more likely to participate in research than students that aspired to complete a bachelor’s degree only. Results of the in-depth interviews with NHOPP established researchers indicated facilitators in achieving a research career included mentorship, interconnectedness with culture and community, hard work, determination, and research training program participation. Barriers to NHOPP research careers were lack of a career role model, differences in indigenous culture versus research culture, and discrimination. Results of this dissertation can be used to inform the improvement of health research training programs for NHOPP. Results of this dissertation can provide insight into designing effective health research training programs for NHOPP students, and ultimately increasing the number of NHOPP health science researchers to address racial and ethnic health disparities in the U.S.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:135 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63256
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D - Public Health


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