Branding in Architecture: Image and Spatial Communication

dc.contributor.advisor Palagi, Kris
dc.contributor.author Okaneku, Reid
dc.contributor.department Architecture
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-04T22:29:08Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-04T22:29:08Z
dc.date.issued 2011-05
dc.description.abstract This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public. This research explores how a brand is expressed through product, customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients, this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a “storyboard diagram.” This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public. This research explores how a brand is expressed through product, customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients, this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a “storyboard diagram.” This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public. This research explores how a brand is expressed through product, customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients, this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a “storyboard diagram.” This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public. This research explores how a brand is expressed through product, customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients, this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a “storyboard diagram.” This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public. This research explores how a brand is expressed through product, customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients, this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a “storyboard diagram.” This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public. This research explores how a brand is expressed through product, customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients, this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a “storyboard diagram.” This project aims to develop a clear understanding of the role and process of branding in architecture. Too often, the breadth of brand is reduced to a common logo. By analyzing a client’s goals to a specific branded attribute, designers have an opportunity to develop a stronger branded identity to relay the client’s business accurately to the public. This research explores how a brand is expressed through product, customer interaction, and physical space. With the use of 2D and 3D creations, designers are able to tell a story without a saying a word. To clarify the understanding of brand between the design team and clients, this research tests a tangible representation of brand in the form of a “storyboard diagram.”
dc.format.extent 167 pages
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/45729
dc.language.iso eng
dc.title Branding in Architecture: Image and Spatial Communication
dc.type Doctorate Project
dc.type.dcmi Text
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