An Aerial Study of Hawaiian Wave Patterns

dc.contributor.author Emery, K.O. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-03-09T06:11:28Z
dc.date.available 2009-03-09T06:11:28Z
dc.date.issued 1963-07 en_US
dc.description.abstract Most of us who have had some experience at sea on small power or sailing boats have noted that the sea surface is crossed by usually more than a single train or set of waves. Each train can be identified by its direction, period, and height. Sometimes one train is so dominant that others may not be noticed. The Marshall Islanders of the nineteenth century and earlier, past masters in the art of handling small boats, used wave trains as a navigational aid with their famous stick charts . The dominant train of waves, produced by the trad e winds, was designated by long parallel sticks tied to a rigid frame. Trains of smaller waves, some produced by bending around islands-were shown by small sticks attached at angles to the long ones. A brief review of these maps and of pertinent literature was given by Emery, Tracey, and Ladd (1954:5). en_US
dc.identifier.citation Emery KO. 1963. An aerial study of Hawaiian wave patterns. Pac Sci 17(3): 255-260. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0030-8870 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/7136
dc.language.iso en-US en_US
dc.publisher University of Hawai'i Press en_US
dc.title An Aerial Study of Hawaiian Wave Patterns en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.type.dcmi Text en_US
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