Sex Work, Migration, and the United States Trafficking in Persons Report: Promoting Rights or Missing Opportunities for Advocacy?

Date
2015
Authors
Petersen, Carole J.
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Volume Title
Publisher
Indiana International & Comparative Law Review
Abstract
While the feminist debate on commercial sex reflects strong theoretical differences, all sides acknowledge the importance of studying women's experiences in particular situations.1 Post-colonial feminist theory has sharpened the analysis of sex work by demonstrating the dangers of assuming a single narrative of victimization.2 Women's accounts of sex work are affected by a multitude of factors, including economic inequality; the presence or absence of legal rights; and gender, ethnic, and class discrimination.3 The state plays an important role as it largely determines whether sex workers (both migrant and domestic) are viewed as victims, criminals, or working persons.4
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Citation
Petersen, C. Sex Work, Migration, and the United States Trafficking in Persons Report: Promoting Rights or Missing Opportunities for Advocacy? 25 Ind. Int'l & Comp. L. Rev. 115 2015.
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