O Niu ka inoa: Management implications for Niu fishery within Maunalua bay, based on community stories and historical timelines of a degraded nearshore area

dc.contributor.advisor Vaughan, Mehana
dc.contributor.author Hoshijo, Kai L N
dc.contributor.instructor Miura, Tomoaki
dc.date.accessioned 2023-01-12T18:16:08Z
dc.date.available 2023-01-12T18:16:08Z
dc.date.issued 2022-05
dc.description.course Master’s in Environmental Management (MEM) Capstone Reports
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10125/104500
dc.subject TEK
dc.subject FishingStories
dc.subject Adaptivemanagement
dc.subject Hawaiians--Fishing
dc.subject fisherycomanagement
dc.title O Niu ka inoa: Management implications for Niu fishery within Maunalua bay, based on community stories and historical timelines of a degraded nearshore area
dc.type text
dcterms.abstract Nearshore fishery degradation is a significant issue in Hawai‘i and around the globe, affecting indigenous people, cultures, communities, and their way of life. Historically, Maunalua Bay is well known for Hawaiian resource management practices, abundant nearshore food sources, and loko i‘a1 that provided food for the population (Maunalua.net). However, like other areas in Hawai‘i, nearshore fishery degradation in Maunalua Bay has left bay health ‘degraded’ and one of the worst in the State of Hawai‘i (Minton et al., 2014). The ridge-to-reef ahupua‘a2 division of Niu is located within Maunalua Bay and shares this story. Valuable work in recent years has focused on community-based management of rural fisheries like Hāʻena, Mo‘omomi, and Kaʻūpulehu and the integration of traditional ecological knowledge and western knowledge bases, but very little has been written about these concepts in degraded nearshore fisheries attached to urban and developed land. In this project I analyzed Niu, an ahupua‘a within Maunalua bay to understand three questions: 1) What are the historic Konohiki Management practices of Niu 2) What are longtime fisherpeople perspectives of the nearshore fishery? 3) What are management recommendations for the nearshore based on the historical context of konohiki management systems and fisherpeople knowledge? I used a layering approach in grounded theory focused on collecting primary and secondary sources from Hawaiian nūpepa3, Māhele ʻāina documents4, government records, books, maps, photos, community interviews, and key informant meetings over the course of two years. The research revealed useful results: origins of ownership and konohiki title to Niu, the history of konohiki governance in Niu and fishing practices, guiding questions, and key themes from fishing interviews and informal meetings. Takeaways from the analysis highlight a need to redefine the scale of place based fisheries management in Maunalua Bay, management implications from an enhanced understanding of Konohiki fisheries management within current state law, Holu (resiliency) within adaptation in the face of degradation, and one hānau5 as a relevant theme for nearshore fisheries management.
dcterms.extent 60 pages
dcterms.rightsHolder Hoshijo, Kai L N
dcterms.spatial Hawaii
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