Ethnobotany of Dacryodes edulis (G.Don) H.J. Lam in Southern Nigeria 2: Practices and applications among Igbo-speaking people

dc.contributor.author Omonhinmin, Conrad Asotie en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-09T02:01:49Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-09T02:01:49Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_US
dc.description.abstract The Igbos of Southeast Nigeria believe ube (Dacryodes edulis (G.Don) H.J.Lam) originated in the region. The plant is heavily cultivated around homes, homesteads, and village centers as a preferred reception/meeting point. It constitutes a key auxiliary income source for farmers, women, and vendors alike. The whole plant and/or its parts are associated with several practices and applications amongst the Igbo tribal people. It is preferable to soften the fruits with hot ashes and eat it with maize. The people utilize the plant’s medicinal properties for managing a vast number of health conditions. In some areas, the plant is venerated as “pure” or “sacred” because of historical mysterious events linked to it. The idioms and proverbs relating to the plant show the importance of ube in the Igbos cultural system. These connections cut across worship, marriage, birth, chieftaincy/coronation, dispute, recreation, construction, and craftworks. Ardent efforts are required to preserve this rich ethnobotanical knowledge as well as a section of the plant’s (small-sized fruit) germplasm, which is threatened by the prevailing trade and domestication trends that favor large-sized fruit types within and beyond the tribal confines. en_US
dc.format.extent 10 pages en_US
dc.identifier.citation Omonhinmin, C. 2014. Ethnobotany of Dacryodes edulis (G.Don) H.J. Lam in Southern Nigeria 2: Practices and applications among Igbo-speaking people. Ethnobotany Research & Applications 12: 71-80. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1547-3465 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/33992
dc.language.iso en-US en_US
dc.publisher Botany Department, University of Hawaii at Manoa en_US
dc.title Ethnobotany of Dacryodes edulis (G.Don) H.J. Lam in Southern Nigeria 2: Practices and applications among Igbo-speaking people en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.type.dcmi Text en_US
local.identifier.alturi http://lib-ojs3.lib.sfu.ca:8114/index.php/era/article/view/922 en_US
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