EXAMINING INDIVIDUAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS THAT EXPLAIN DEGREE SUCCESS AMONG INSTITUTIONS SERVING NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTS

dc.contributor.advisor Heck, Ronald
dc.contributor.advisor Lucas, Chris
dc.contributor.author Udarbe-Valdez, Christine M.
dc.contributor.department Educational Administration
dc.date.accessioned 2023-02-23T23:57:01Z
dc.date.available 2023-02-23T23:57:01Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.description.degree D.Ed.
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10125/104641
dc.subject Educational administration
dc.subject Education
dc.subject Fixed Effects Regression
dc.subject Native American degree conferral
dc.subject Transculturation Theory
dc.subject Undergraduate degree conferral
dc.subject Validation Theory
dc.title EXAMINING INDIVIDUAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS THAT EXPLAIN DEGREE SUCCESS AMONG INSTITUTIONS SERVING NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTS
dc.type Thesis
dcterms.abstract This study examined institutional variables that contribute to the overall academic success of first-time, full-time freshman students pursuing bachelor's degrees in 60 public colleges and universities serving considerable numbers of Native American students. Utilizing a fixed-effects regression approach, several time-varying covariates (e.g., enrollment, number of instructional faculty and staff, aid received) significantly influenced at several degree conferral points including 100%, 150% or 200% for the students attending the population of institutions. For Native American students, more specifically, overall degree conferral at 100% was influenced by the number of Native American instructional faculty and staff employed in the population of institutions, amount of financial aid received, and the cost of tuition and fees. For degree conferral at 150%, the number of Native American enrollment, the number of Native American tenured faculty, and tuition and fees were statistically significant, time-varying covariates. The combined lens of the Validation Theory and Transculturation Theory frameworks provided a deeper understanding of Native American history, identity, culture, values, traditions, social-emotional needs, and educational needs as they relate to retention and completion. The four primary strategies aimed at supporting student success were: (i) increasing Native American instructional staff and tenured faculty; (ii) making postsecondary education more affordable; and (iv) building professional capacity and consistently implementing culturally relevant, inclusive practices.The findings have important contributions and implications for practice and research regarding addressing educational equity and access disparities to promote student success and narrow the academic and socio-economic gap for Native American students.
dcterms.extent 143 pages
dcterms.language en
dcterms.publisher University of Hawai'i at Manoa
dcterms.rights All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
dcterms.type Text
local.identifier.alturi http://dissertations.umi.com/hawii:11585
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