Signal Systems Experiencing Ecological Reconnection Through Communicative Biomimesis

Date
2011-12
Authors
Simonson, Elizabeth
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Abstract
Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.Throughout the evolution of mankind, technological advancement has supported rapid urbanization and the development of modern convenience. As societies develop, a detrimental shift has occurred in human cultural evolution. While urbanization has led to comfort and convenience, a change has also occurred in the way people relate to their built environment. Human cultures have long been based upon the natural environment in which they are encompassed, but as populations move away from the natural environment, cultural development hads detached from its natural basis, thus severing the co-evolutionary process between man and nature. Built environments have digressed from occupiable spatial supplements within the natural environment, into structures which hinder any connection between nature and humankind. This has in turn detached much of the human cultural connection to the natural environment. To remedy this detachment, this research focuses on the development of a biomimetic design methodology that employs spatial experience as a means of communication. This design methodology is then applied to three densely urbanized sites through the insertion of a footbridge overpass. Toronto, Singapore, and Perth, are each located in varied climatic regions, providing highly varied biota from which the biomimetic design methodology is based. Each overpass, features five spatial components, each communicating specific environmental status levels taken from the immediate surrounding natural environment. Each overpass is then analyzed in terms of how effectively the five components perform spatial communication. Possible improvements are explored, both in terms of spatial communication, and coherence of the biomimetic language. Projected future applications are considered, and explorations of alternative uses are analyzed.
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