FACTORIAL INVESTIGATION OF PRESSURIZED SLOW PYROLYSIS FOR CARBONIZATION OF SOLID WASTE

Date
2024
Authors
Castillo, Christian Jayme Agbalog
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Turn, Scott Q.
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Mechanical Engineering
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Many wastes, containing plastics and other materials, in the globe are sent to landfills where they degrade overtime and emit hazardous gases that contribute to greenhouse gases. Military forward operating bases (FOB) have adopted similar waste disposal methods by collecting their waste in burn pits and setting the waste on fire until it burns away completely. However, many soldiers stationed at these FOBs have developed illnesses such as lung cancer which are reportedly linked to these burn pits. Researchers are seeking solutions to manage the effects of waste disposal at military bases. Constant volume carbonization (CVC) and high pressured pyrolysis of biomass, such as wood, have been studied and shown to improve the quality of charcoal from the biomass by reduce its volatile matter and improving its fixed carbon content through pyrolysis. In this study, CVC experiments were conducted on waste materials based on compositions reported in FOBs to determine pyrolysis capabilities in mitigating waste disposal. Co-pyrolysis of polystyrene (PS) with biomass showed potential of devolatilization of plastic through the chemical bonding of the materials. The focused waste materials included dog food, fiber trays, Norwegian birch wood, PS, and rubber. Test variables studied on constant volume waste pyrolysis include reaction time, initial pressure, sandbath temperature, and waste composition to analyze the variable effective. Evaluation of the waste mitigation was done through product yield recovery, proximate analysis of char products, fixed carbon yield determination, derivative thermogravimetric analysis, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry.
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Mechanical engineering
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156 pages
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