Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/96

Parasitism of Hawaiian Non-Frugivorous Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) by an Exotic Parasitoid, Eurytoma tephritidis Fullaway (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae)

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Title:Parasitism of Hawaiian Non-Frugivorous Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) by an Exotic Parasitoid, Eurytoma tephritidis Fullaway (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae)
Authors:Alyokhin, Andrei V.
Messing, Russell H.
Keywords:Eurytoma tephritidis
parasitoids
Hawaii
Tetreuaresta obscuriventris
Ensina sonchi
show 15 moreAcinia picturata
Procecidochares utilis
Procecidochares alani
Trupanea
introduced species
biological control agents
nontarget organisms
fruit flies
Tephritidae
parasitism
host range
indigenous species
insect surveys
risk assessment
invasive species
show less
Date Issued:Nov 2003
Publisher:Hawaiian Entomological Society
Citation:Alyokhin AV, Messing RH. 2003. Parasitism of Hawaiian non-frugivorous fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) by an exotic parasitoid, Eurytoma tephritidis Fullaway (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae). Proc Hawaiian Entomol Soc 36:29–37.
Abstract:Eurytoma tephritidis Fullaway (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) is an exotic solitary larval endoparasitoid that has been recorded to parasitize gall-forming tephritids in Hawaii. We surveyed E. tephritidis parasitism of Tetreuaresta obscuriventris (Loew.), Ensina sonchi (L.), Acinia picturata (Snow), Procecidochares utilis Stone, P. alani Steyskal, Trupanea sp. nr. cratericola, and T. dubautiae (Bryan) (Diptera: Tephritidae) on four major Hawaiian islands. No wasps emerged from T. obscuriventris and E. sonchi. Among other species, percent parasitism ranged from less than 1% to over 67%, depending on fly species and sampling location. Overall, E. tephritidis showed higher affinity for gall-forming tephritids than flowerhead-feeders, although it parasitized substantial numbers of the native flower-infesting T. sp. nr. cratericola. The implications of our findings for a more accurate estimation of the risks posed by biological control programs to non-target fruit flies in Hawaii are discussed.
URI/DOI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/96
ISSN:0073-134X
Appears in Collections: Volume 36 - November 2003 : Hawaiian Entomological Society


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