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Best Management Practices to Protect Endangered and Native Birds at Solar Installations in Hawai`i

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Title:Best Management Practices to Protect Endangered and Native Birds at Solar Installations in Hawai`i
Authors:Penniman, Jay F.
Duffy, David C.
Keywords:Solar facilities impacts
ecological light pollution
polarized light pollution
solar energy development
Wildlife impacts
show 3 moreRenewable energy
Industrial scale PV
Hawaii birds
show less
Date Issued:Nov 2021
Publisher:Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit
Citation:Penniman, J.F. and D. Duffy. 2021. Best Management Practices to Protect Endangered and Native Birds at Solar Installations in Hawai`i. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit Technical Report #203. University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Department of Life Sciences. Honolulu, HI. 28 pages.
Series:203;
Abstract:Solar Energy facilities in Hawaiʻi are a growing major source of low carbon emission energy generation as the state strives to reduce emissions of greenhouse gasses to prevent the worst predictions of global climate change. It is incumbent upon developers of these facilities to consider wildlife impacts and take measures to mitigate for them. While the technology is relatively new there are evolving best management practices that should be undertaken. We identify five endangered waterbird species, three listed seabird species, and one raptor of conservation concern, that have been or may be at risk from solar energy generation facilities in Hawaiʻi. In addition, there are migratory species: fifteen waterbirds and seventeen shorebirds that may be vulnerable. We review relevant literature for impacts and consequences of wildlife interactions with solar energy facilities and recommend best management practices to minimize wildlife impacts. Design considerations for minimizing wildlife impacts are identified, and must be implemented and followed by monitoring to identify and quantify downed wildlife incidents and further development of effective mitigation strategies.
Description:Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Pages/Duration:27 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/79131
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
Appears in Collections: The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current


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