Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/76403

THE COMPARISON OF SELF-ADMINISTERED, UNSUPERVISED AT HOME TESTING AND AT SCHOOL, SUPERVISED GROUP TESTING OF THE IMPACT BASELINE COMPOSITE SCORES IN ONE INTERSCHOLASTIC HIGH SCHOOL

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Title:THE COMPARISON OF SELF-ADMINISTERED, UNSUPERVISED AT HOME TESTING AND AT SCHOOL, SUPERVISED GROUP TESTING OF THE IMPACT BASELINE COMPOSITE SCORES IN ONE INTERSCHOLASTIC HIGH SCHOOL
Authors:Brothers, Darian D.
Contributors:Murata, Nathan (advisor)
Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Science (department)
Keywords:Kinesiology
Date Issued:2021
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:AbstractContext: Baseline concussion testing has been a common practice in head injury management, and the administration environment suggests to have an effect on the outcome scores. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing restrictions prohibited concussion baseline testing in group settings. Objective: To compare Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) baseline scores of supervised groups to baselines taken unsupervised individually. Design: Retrospective study. Participants: 50 different individuals were selected from both the 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 school years; 2019-2020 took the baseline in a supervised group setting, 2020-2021 were unsupervised and self-administered the baseline. Both groups were from the same institution, matched by age, gender, sport, and history of concussions. Procedures: The 2019-2020 athletes took the ImPACT baseline in the institute’s library, supervised by the employed athletic trainers. The 2020-2021 athletes were given an institution specific access code to input in order to self-administer the baseline at home (or where they had computer access). MANOVA was used to compare the composite scores (verbal memory, visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, and impulse control) and an Independent T-test was used to compare the symptom scale. Results: No significant difference was found between the composite scores of the two groups [V = 0.45, F(5,94) = 0.89, p = .49]. One symptom score, visual problems, was deemed significantly higher in the supervised group. Conclusion: The influence of certain test administration factors can have an effect on testing outcomes for every individual and must be considered when administering concussion baseline testing. Consistent control of administration and scripted instructions in future studies will fill the gaps that remain in the debate of baseline administration.
Word Count: 270
Pages/Duration:47 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/76403
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Science


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