Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/75885

IMPROVED THERMAL COMFORT FOR HAWAI‘I’S ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS: DESIGNING AN EDUCATIONAL BUILDING FOR THERMAL COMFORT USING PASSIVE DESIGN TECHNIQUES IN THE HOT AND HUMID CLIMATE

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Title:IMPROVED THERMAL COMFORT FOR HAWAI‘I’S ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS: DESIGNING AN EDUCATIONAL BUILDING FOR THERMAL COMFORT USING PASSIVE DESIGN TECHNIQUES IN THE HOT AND HUMID CLIMATE
Authors:Foster, Sydney
Contributors:Meguro, Wendy (advisor)
Architecture (department)
Keywords:Architecture
hot and humid climates
natural ventilation
passive cooling
Passive Design
show 1 morethermal comfort
show less
Date Issued:2021
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:With average daily temperatures reaching 78 ˚F, and a relative humidity reaching 90%, the tropical climate of Hawaiʻi is no exception to the challenges when designing for thermal comfort. Most public schools in Hawaiʻi are well over 50 years old; dated construction techniques paired with insufficient facilities present the further need to reevaluate the architecture related to classroom design, with thermal comfort at the forefront of this process. Additionally, more than 75% of the indoor climatic conditions in Hawaiʻi classrooms do not meet the requirements of the Standard 55 summer comfort zone.The objective of this research is to determine the applicability of passive design techniques to promote thermal comfort (Standard 55) in school settings in a tropical climate. Research has been conducted with the selection of a non-air-conditioned public school in Hauʻula, Hawaiʻi to study the influence of passive techniques in relation to the thermal comfort levels within the classrooms. A holistic approach to design highlights the use of passive design to reduce the energy consumption of a building and promote thermal comfort for occupants. The proposed new design presents methods that comply with the ASHRAE Standard 55, Thermal Environmental Conditions For Human Occupancy while outlining the principles needed for a building design that promotes thermal comfort. The study presents the success of specific principles to work truly as part of the integrative design process.
The proposed building designed with passive features that use the building form to mitigate the local climatic effects allow for effective passive cooling. The culmination of research is formed from the topics of thermodynamics, passive design, and thermal comfort. The final proposed design is presented diagrammatically to justify successful design principles related to passive design in classrooms of the tropical climate. The resulting research is beneficial for architects practicing in tropical regions, like Hawaiʻi.
Pages/Duration:122 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/75885
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: D.ARCH. - Architecture


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