Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/73350

THE SECOND LANDING FROM A DROP VERTICAL JUMP: A BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS AND CLINICAL APPLICATION TO ENHANCE EVALUATION OF ACL INJURY RISK IN FEMALE ATHLETES

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Title:THE SECOND LANDING FROM A DROP VERTICAL JUMP: A BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS AND CLINICAL APPLICATION TO ENHANCE EVALUATION OF ACL INJURY RISK IN FEMALE ATHLETES
Authors:Letchford, Elizabeth Campbell
Contributors:Stickley, Cristopher (advisor)
Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Science (department)
Keywords:Kinesiology
Biomechanics
ACL Injury
Clinical Assessment
Drop Vertical Jump
show 1 moreInjury Prevention
show less
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:The primary interest of the presented dissertation was to evaluate whether the second landing from a Drop Vertical Jump (DVJ) differs from the first with regards to neuromuscular control and landing mechanics in order to determine whether this second landing improves the predictive ability of clinical evaluations to properly identify athletes at risk for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury. Three manuscripts were completed in order to gain a more complete understanding of the relationship between the first and second landings from a drop vertical jump and their implications for injury risk evaluation. An analysis of the differences between the first and second landings according to the methodology established by the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) was performed to gain insight into the biomechanical differences between the two tasks and to gain a better understanding of their utility. An evaluation of LESS scores associated with the first landing and the second landing was performed to determine the extent to which the individual scoring items between landings were related to each other. Finally, by investigating the ability of DVJ biomechanical variables to predict known injury risk variables during a side-cutting task, it was possible to gather insight into the relationship between the two tasks. These manuscripts represent the progression of a research agenda investigating the utility of the second landing from a drop vertical jump for the development of a more comprehensive testing scenario that better predicts an athlete’s risk for injury while being simple enough to perform on-field by Athletic Trainers and coaches.
Pages/Duration:193 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/73350
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Science


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