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Capturing Co-evolutionary Information Systems Alignment: Conceptualization and Scale Development

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Title:Capturing Co-evolutionary Information Systems Alignment: Conceptualization and Scale Development
Authors:Walraven, Pien
Van De Wetering, Rogier
Caniëls, Marjolein
Versendaal, Johan
Helms, Remko
Keywords:IT Governance and its Mechanisms
business-it alignment
co-evolutionary information systems alignment
complexity
operationalization
show 1 morescale development
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Date Issued:05 Jan 2021
Abstract:Co-evolutionary approaches to business-IT alignment, such as Co-evolutionary information systems alignment (COISA), have gained attention from scholars and practitioners over the last decade. COISA is an organizational capability defined as continuously exercised alignment competencies, characterized by co-evolutionary interactions between heterogeneous IS stakeholders, in pursuit of a common interpretation and implementation of what it means to apply IT in an appropriate and timely way. In spite of some conceptual and empirical work on COISA, a validated operationalization for empirical measurements for science and practice is not available in the extant literature. We developed a measurement scale through acknowledged procedures, entailing a multivariate structural model consisting of specific facilitators leading to effective alignment competencies. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to propose such a scale.
Pages/Duration:10 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/71348
ISBN:978-0-9981331-4-0
DOI:10.24251/HICSS.2021.728
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections: IT Governance and its Mechanisms


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