Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/71146

Does High Cybersecurity Capability Lead to Openness in Digital Trade? The Mediation Effect of E-Government Maturity

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Title:Does High Cybersecurity Capability Lead to Openness in Digital Trade? The Mediation Effect of E-Government Maturity
Authors:Huang, Keman
Madnick, Stuart
Keywords:Global, International, and Cross-Cultural Issues in the Digital Economy
cybersecurity capability
digital economy
digital trade
e-government maturity
show 1 moretrade restriction
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Date Issued:05 Jan 2021
Abstract:Cybersecurity risks threaten the digital economy, including digital trade enabled by digital technologies. As parts of cybersecurity capability building, governments implement fragmented, in-flux policies to manage cybersecurity threats from cross-border digital activities. However, the lack of shared understandings of cybersecurity within cross-border digital innovations raises an increasing debate about how cybersecurity capability building policies can impact digital trade restrictions. This study develops a National Cyber Trade Behavior model to examine the relationship between national cybersecurity capability and digital trade restrictions. Utilizing the PLS-SEM-based path analysis, we draw empirical evidence to verify the developed model and reveal that building cybersecurity capability can indirectly support an open digital trade system, mediated by E-government maturity.
Pages/Duration:10 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/71146
ISBN:978-0-9981331-4-0
DOI:10.24251/HICSS.2021.529
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections: Global, International, and Cross-Cultural Issues in the Digital Economy


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