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Designing a Gamified Adherence System for Tuberculosis Treatment Support in Urban Vietnam

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Title:Designing a Gamified Adherence System for Tuberculosis Treatment Support in Urban Vietnam
Authors:Ostern, Nadine
Perscheid, Guido
Moormann, Jürgen
Keywords:Health Behavior Change Support Systems (HBCSS)
design science
e-health
gamification
system design
show 1 moretuberculosis
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Date Issued:05 Jan 2021
Abstract:Tuberculosis remains one of the deadliest infectious diseases in Vietnam. Its occurrence is exacerbated by erratic treatment, in particular by taking medication only sporadically or if patients discontinue the medication in an early stage. Previous approaches to support treatment adherence focus on monitoring (e.g., tele-observation) or external stimulation (e.g., rewards). These approaches, however, have not yet shown the desired effects. We assert that this is because current approaches focus on combatting the outcome, i.e., erratic treatment, instead of tackling the reasons for treatment non- compliance. Notably, the latter is heavily related to the stigmatization of TB patients and, especially, self- stigmatization. Using a design science research approach, this paper proposes a research plan for developing a gamified information system that aims at reducing patients self-stigmatization, by providing features that support TB patients community building as well as TB patients empowerment.
Pages/Duration:8 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/71037
ISBN:978-0-9981331-4-0
DOI:10.24251/HICSS.2021.421
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections: Health Behavior Change Support Systems (HBCSS)


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