Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/70351

FEASIBILITY OF CAV DELIVERY SERVICE IN RURAL AREAS

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Title:FEASIBILITY OF CAV DELIVERY SERVICE IN RURAL AREAS
Authors:alghamdi, abdulrahman
Contributors:Prevedouros,, Panos D. (advisor)
Civil Engineering (department)
Keywords:Transportation
Urban planning
CAV
Delivery Service
Driverless Vehicle
show 1 moreRural Areas
show less
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Urban areas have been experiencing pilot deployments of automated delivery technology. However, the
benefits may be much more significant for rural areas with delivery distances of 20 miles or longer to the
large potential savings in travel time, travel cost, and crash risk. In rural areas, distances are longer, the
fatality rate is higher (2.1 times higher in rural areas than in urban areas in 2017) and rural residents
commonly drive larger, less fuel-efficient vehicles, which increases operation and ownership costs. The
feasibility analysis of a CAV delivery service in rural areas is the objective of this research. A detailed
methodology was developed and applied to two case studies; one between Hilo and Volcano Village in
Hawaii, as a case of deliveries over a moderate distance (~50 mile roundtrip) in a high-cost environment,
and between Spokane and Sprague in Washington State, as a case of deliveries over a long distance (~80
mile roundtrip) in a low-cost environment. The case study comprises the market study for grocery
requirements of an average family and the detailed transport costs associated with its delivery. Three light-duty
delivery vehicles were chosen, all based on a similar Nissan van. They are a person-driven NV200
(gasoline), a person-driven e-NV200 (electric), and a CAV e-NV200. The case study results suggest that the
CAV e-NV200 is the most viable option implementing a delivery business for rural areas based on a break
even analysis that did not monetize accident risk and crash costs.
Pages/Duration:68 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/70351
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Civil Engineering


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