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Confronting literacy in Chinese as a foreign language

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Title:Confronting literacy in Chinese as a foreign language
Authors:Everson, Michael E.
Date Issued:01 Jan 2016
Publisher:Heinle Cengage Learning
Citation:Everson, M.E. (2016). Confronting literacy in Chinese as a foreign language. The American Association of University Supervisors, Coordinators and Directors of Foreign Languages Programs (AAUSC), 159-173. http://hdl.handle.net/102015/69761
Abstract:While critics of standards-based movements such as Common Core State Standards
(CCSS) may argue over issues of content, testing, and perceptions of government
control over education, few argue against the need for some type of well-reasoned
set of standards if educators are to orchestrate principled instructional sequences.
The foreign language community is no exception, having devoted an enormous
amount of dedication to standards-based instructional development, the most
current guidance for which is embodied in the World-
Readiness Standards for
Learning Languages (WRSLL). These standards should be viewed as good news for the growing Chinese-language education field. Yet, these standards also force
Chinese-language stakeholders to openly confront perhaps the most professionally
vexing dimension of Chinese language education: teaching students to read and
write. This chapter will discuss issues in Chinese literacy
from both a theoretical
and applied standpoint. The chapter’s goal is to help stakeholders in Chinese and
in world languages understand how standards-based instruction raises the ante in
terms of what will be expected from students in a variety of educational settings;
I also address how these expectations may need to be tempered, given the
enormous
amount of time and effort students expend in acquiring Chinese literacy
skills. The article will draw from theories and models of second-language reading,
as well as the research and experience of Chinese language educators, to highlight
points of contention that need airing and professional resolution.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69761
Volume:2016
Appears in Collections: 2016 THE INTERCONNECTED LANGUAGE CURRICULUM: CRITICAL TRANSITIONS AND INTERFACES IN ARTICULATED K-16 CONTEXTS


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