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Drama in the classroom: Post-holistic considerations

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Title:Drama in the classroom: Post-holistic considerations
Authors:Shmenk, Barbara
Date Issued:01 Jan 2015
Publisher:Heinle Cengage Learning
Citation:Shmenk, B. (2015). Drama in the classroom: Post-holistic considerations. The American Association of University Supervisors, Coordinators and Directors of Foreign Languages Programs (AAUSC), 91-108. http://hdl.handle.net/102015/69748
Abstract:This chapter looks at the use of drama in language education, focusing on the
notion
of holistic learning to which proponents of drama in language education
often refer when outlining the educational backdrops and goals of using drama in
the foreign language classroom. The first part offers a brief account of what holistic
learning entails and how it has been implemented in foreign language education.
Taking the notion of the holistic seriously, it shows that many communicative
language classrooms do not truly engage the “whole learner.” Integrating holistic
learning into foreign language learning environments requires more explicit
dramatizing
of the communicative, i.e., using elements of drama. Subsequently, in
light of more recent and poststructuralist views on language learning and learner
identities, we have the argument that drama allows for holistic learning in foreign
language education. These approaches challenge some of the basic assumptions
about holistic learning and drama in foreign language education as they imply
a subversion of the notion of holistic learning. Therefore, the argument reconstructed
in part one of this chapter gets deconstructed in the course of part two.
Section two outlines an alternative theoretical framework within which drama in
language education can be viewed less as a pedagogical process that involves the
“whole learner,” but that is instead based on a view of subjectivity as dynamic, inprocess,
and fragmented. In conclusion, the proposed framework is discussed (a)
with respect to its practical implications for language learning integration of the
arts, using an example to illustrate the points discussed; and (b) in light of language
teaching and TA training in university level language education.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69748
Volume:2015
Appears in Collections: 2015 INTEGRATING THE ARTS: CREATIVE THINKING ABOUT FOREIGN LANGUAGE CURRICULA AND LANGUAGE PROGRAM DIRECTION


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