Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69340

Reasonable Accommodation and Information Accessibility by Various Formats the Difference Between Braille, Sign Language, and Speech Format

Item Summary

Title:Reasonable Accommodation and Information Accessibility by Various Formats the Difference Between Braille, Sign Language, and Speech Format
Authors:Matsuzaki, Yoshimi
Hamamatsu, Wakaba
Shibata, Kuniomi
Author Affiliation:Matsuzaki, Yoshimi: Department of International & Cultural Studies and Inclusive Education Support Division, Tsuda University
Hamamatsu, Wakaba: Graduate School of International & Cultural Studies and Inclusive Education Support Division, Tsuda University
Shibata, Kuniomi: Department of International & Cultural Studies and Inclusive Education Support Division, Tsuda University
Keywords:Information Accessibility
Reading Accessibility
Higher Education
Means of Transmission
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Type:Research/Theory Focus
Abstract:Information accessibility for persons with visual disabilities is the transformation into text data, braille or speech format. For persons with hearing disabilities, information accessibility includes closed-captioning, notetaking, and sign language translation services. Although such methods are standard and essential, this paper will discuss possible differences in comprehensibility between these various formats. We designed a research project, ‘Reasonable Accommodations of Reading Accessibility (RARA),’ to evaluate the consistency of academic quality in braille, sign language, and speech formats. First, we will focus on the features of the Japanese language, because these features could possibly affect the differences in the understanding among each means of conveying. Second, we introduce two concepts, Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), as key factors in our research project. Third, we will discuss the outcomes of interviews from 2018 that targeted each two users of braille and of sign language. The outcomes suggested mainly about unique ways of understanding content in various means of transmission. Finally, we will outline the present phase of the RARA project.
Pages/Duration:15 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69340
Rights:Creative Commons License: CC-BY
Rights Holder:Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Appears in Collections: PacRim 2020 Conference Proceedings


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