Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69122

SITE-SPECIFIC, SCULPTURAL GREEN WALL SYSTEMS AS ARTISTIC ACTIVISM: PROMOTING A SENSE OF PLACE AND WELLBEING IN HAWAI‘I THROUGH BIOPHILIC DESIGN

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Title:SITE-SPECIFIC, SCULPTURAL GREEN WALL SYSTEMS AS ARTISTIC ACTIVISM: PROMOTING A SENSE OF PLACE AND WELLBEING IN HAWAI‘I THROUGH BIOPHILIC DESIGN
Authors:Chow, Erin Larissa
Contributors:Chapman, William (advisor)
Architecture (department)
Keywords:Architecture
Landscape architecture
Biophilic Design
Green Walls
Land Art
show 3 moreSense of Place
Site-Specific Design
Tophilia
show less
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:O‘ahu’s urbanization, which primarily occurred following World War II, removed much of the precontact historical landscape. Eighty-five percent of native rainforests were destroyed, and fifty-seven percent of streams were channelized during the first hundred years of Western interaction. This resulted in a great loss of native biodiversity, and it significantly changed the original cultural context within the built environment. Can architecture in Hawai‘i somehow pay tribute to the agricultural, sustainable past amidst continual urbanization? Is it possible to create a greater sense of place in buildings that are often noted as being out of place? This research seeks to find the transformative potential of green wall systems or vertical living walls in revitalizing the environmental landscape of old Hawai‘i. These biophilic installations have become popular within the past few decades due to their environmental benefits and aesthetic qualities.
In addition to the known benefits of green walls, can the design of site-specific, sculptural green wall systems act as artistic activism to promote a sense of well-being and cultural values? Can plants act as an artistic medium, similar to paint, to inherently communicate ideas? This research will offer a perspective on green walls that will reveal the parallels between culturally significant art within the built environment and artistically designed vertical living walls.
The resulting outcome of this research is the design of sculptural, site-specific green walls that promotes a greater sense of place and well-being based on developed design principles. The guidance of experts, theories of human response to the environment, history, and current scientific studies on green walls informed the developed design principles.
Pages/Duration:146 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69122
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: D.ARCH. - Architecture


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